paintress


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paintress

(ˈpeɪntrɛs)
n
a female painter
References in periodicals archive ?
When young paintress Megan Cresswell is left penniless in 1950, her choice is stark - struggle to pay the bills or find a husband.
Bilek, Suzanne (2012), "Frida Kahlo: Paintress of Pain," in The Great Female Artists of Detroit.
Ivy left school at 14 to support her widowed mother and sister, finding work on the shop floor at Gray's Pottery, in Hanley, where she trained as a freehand ceramics paintress.
She left school in 1954, aged 15, and joined Maling Pottery in Newcastle's east end, training as a paintress under head painter Anne Rowbotham.
While the left hand window represents the toil and skills of Tyneside's manufacturing workforce and shows images of a coal miner, a welder, a fitter, a woman working a lathe at Parsons works in Newcastle during the Second World War and a paintress at the city's Maling pottery.
First published in 1678, Count Carlo Cesare Malvasia's Felsina Pittrice ("The Paintress Bologna") includes the biographies of Bolognese artists from the twelfth century down to his own time.
Hired as her supervisor, Rhys promotes Frost from paintress to designer, but presses her to create revolutionary designs--ocean liners, saxophones, architectural motifs instead of pastel flora--that he says will uplift the workers and change the world.
The initials LW on the reverse were for paintress Liza Wilkins.
James Chronicle which underlines the tension of this inverted relationship: "To Angelica, the celebrated Paintress, now in England, painting the Author's Picture/While thus you paint with Ease and Grace,/And Spirit, all your own;/Take, if you please, my Mind and Face, But let my Heart alone" (67).
Gordon Forsyth advised her to take employment and she joined Grey & Co of Burslem, Stoke-onTrent as a paintress.