pairing


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pair

 (pâr)
n. pl. pair or pairs
1. Two corresponding persons or items, similar in form or function and matched or associated: a pair of shoes.
2. One object composed of two joined, similar parts that are dependent upon each other: a pair of pliers.
3.
a. Two persons who are married, engaged, or dating.
b. Two persons who have something in common and are considered together: a pair of hunters.
c. Two mated animals.
d. Two animals joined together in work.
4. Games Two playing cards of the same denomination.
5. Two members of a deliberative body with opposing opinions on a given issue who agree to abstain from voting on the issue, thereby offsetting each other.
6. Chemistry An electron pair.
v. paired, pair·ing, pairs
v.tr.
1. To arrange in sets of two; couple: The golfers are paired in twosomes for this round of play.
2. To combine or join (one person or thing) with another to form a pair: a director pairing his favorite actor with an unknown; a salad that is paired with a fine dressing.
v.intr.
1. To form pairs or a pair: The people on the dance floor paired up.
2. To join with another in love or mating.

[Middle English, from Old French paire, from Latin paria, equals, pl. of pār, a pair, from pār, equal; see perə- in Indo-European roots.]
Usage Note: The noun pair can be followed by a singular or plural verb. The singular is always used when pair denotes the set taken as a single entity: This pair of shoes is on sale. A plural verb is used when the members are considered as individuals: The pair are working more harmoniously now. After a number other than one, pair itself can be either singular or plural, but the plural is now more common: I bought six pairs (or pair) of shoes.

pairing

(ˈpɛərɪŋ)
n
1. two people, esp sports players, actors, or musicians, who are working together as a pair
2. the action of putting two people together

pair•ing

(ˈpɛər ɪŋ)

n.
1. a coupling.
2. the lining up of the two homologous chromosomes or chromatids of each chromosome pair in meiosis or mitosis. Compare base pairing.
[1605–15]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pairing - the act of pairing a male and female for reproductive purposespairing - the act of pairing a male and female for reproductive purposes; "the casual couplings of adolescents"; "the mating of some species occurs only in the spring"
sex, sex activity, sexual activity, sexual practice - activities associated with sexual intercourse; "they had sex in the back seat"
assortative mating - mating of individuals having more traits in common than likely in random mating
disassortative mating - mating of individuals having traits more dissimilar than likely in random mating
hybridisation, hybridization, hybridizing, interbreeding, crossbreeding, crossing, cross - (genetics) the act of mixing different species or varieties of animals or plants and thus to produce hybrids
inbreeding - the act of mating closely related individuals
servicing, service - the act of mating by male animals; "the bull was worth good money in servicing fees"
2.pairing - the act of grouping things or people in pairs
buddy system - a cooperative practice of pairing two or more people together for mutual assistance or safety (especially in recreational swimming)
matchup, match-up - the pairing of people or things as for comparison or competition; "it was a good match-up but the home team won"; "we need a matchup of the best teachers with the neediest schools"
grouping - the activity of putting things together in groups

pairing

noun collaboration, partnership, cooperation, linking up the pairing of these two fine musicians
Translations

pairing

[ˈpɛərɪŋ] N
1. (= team) → pareja f, dúo m
2. (Zool) → apareamiento m

pairing

[ˈpɛərɪŋ] n
[two people] → paire f
the pairing of Sellers and Thomas → la paire formée par Sellers et Thomas, la paire Sellers et Thomas
(= putting together) [people] → association f; [foods, flavours] → mariage m
Moviegoers will be intrigued by the pairing of Hanks and Newman → Les cinéphiles seront intrigués par l'association Hanks-Newman.

pairing

n
Paarung f
(Parl) Absprache zwischen Regierungs- und Oppositionsabgeordneten, an einer Abstimmung nicht teilzunehmen, um die Mehrheitsverhältnisse nicht zu verändern, → Pairing nt
References in classic literature ?
In his devouring mind's eye, he pictured to himself every roasting-pig running about with a pudding in his belly, and an apple in his mouth; the pigeons were snugly put to bed in a comfortable pie, and tucked in with a coverlet of crust; the geese were swimming in their own gravy; and the ducks pairing cosily in dishes, like snug married couples, with a decent competency of onion sauce.
The pairing of the birds is an idyl, not tedious as our idyls are; a tempest is a rough ode, without falsehood or rant; a summer, with its harvest sown, reaped, and stored, is an epic song, subordinating how many admirably executed parts.
It was the time of year when they should have been pairing, but not a thrush's nest was built except this big one, and so Solomon soon ran short of thrushes with which to supply the demand from the mainland.
may be attributed in main part to selection not having been brought into play: in cats, from the difficulty in pairing them; in donkeys, from only a few being kept by poor people, and little attention paid to their breeding; in peacocks, from not being very easily reared and a large stock not kept; in geese, from being valuable only for two purposes, food and feathers, and more especially from no pleasure having been felt in the display of distinct breeds.
Hence we can perceive in the fact of the cuckoo pairing several times, and laying her eggs at intervals, the cause of her depositing her eggs in other birds' nests, and leaving them to the care of foster-parents.
Now, I beseech you, do tell me, have you ever attended to their pairing and breeding?
We monitored and confirmed pairing status throughout the nesting cycle, especially noting provisioning visits made by males.
For example, in the 1980s, the "coyness hypothesis" proposed that birds that consummated their pairing only after the arduous job of learning to duet would have a stronger bond that would discourage extra-pair adventuring.
The results are proof enough that they are a strong pairing.
They would then turn to me for a wine pairing suggestion, and I really didn't have much success in my recommendations.
Each device consists of two layers of aluminum, and the strength of the pairing of electrons in each layer can be different.