palaeopathology


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palaeopathology

(ˌpælɪəʊpəˈθɒlədʒɪ)
n
1. (Palaeontology) the study of diseases of ancient man and fossil animals
2. (Medicine) the study of diseases of ancient man and fossil animals
ˈpalaeoˌpathoˈlogical adj
ˌpalaeopaˈthologist n

paleopathology, palaeopathology

Medicine. the study of diseases from former times as found in fossils and mummified remains.
See also: Past
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.palaeopathology - the study of disease of former times (as inferred from fossil evidence)
pathology - the branch of medical science that studies the causes and nature and effects of diseases
archaeology, archeology - the branch of anthropology that studies prehistoric people and their cultures
References in periodicals archive ?
Chapter 3 concerns mortuary behaviour at the site and is particularly important for later considerations on palaeopathology and selective funerary practices.
The study is published in the International Journal of Palaeopathology, and forms part of a British Museum archaeological project.
The NHS junior doctor became a lecturer in anatomy at Bristol University, developing interests in biological/physical anthropology and took a PhD in palaeopathology, the study of disease in ancient human remains.
Palaeopathology - the science that studies diseases in ancient human remains - benefits from these molecular techniques to identify specific varieties of ancient syphilis and generate information that is useful for the phylogenetic reconstruction of modern varieties.
Among the topics are changing paradigms in the understanding of the transition to agriculture, integrating stable isotope studies of diet with palaeopathology to identify subsistence strategies and economy during the Mesolithic-Neolithic transition in eastern Europe; changes in indigenous stature, body size, and body shape with agricultural intensification in North America; body size, skeletal biomechanics, mobility, and habitual activity from the Late Palaeolithic to the Mid-Dynastic Nile Valley; and new light on differences between hunter-gathers and farmers in southern Sweden.
Nine contributions on anayltical approaches discuss the chemical and microbial degradation of bones and teeth, to what extent human skeletal assemblages can be used for population analysis, epidemiological approaches, computed tomography scanning and three-dimensional visualization of mummies and bog bodies, and histological palaeopathology of human infectious disease, among other topics.
The strength of the second part of this book is perhaps attributable to its author's specialisation in the palaeopathology of Australian Indigenes.