palatial


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pa·la·tial

 (pə-lā′shəl)
adj.
1. Of or suitable for a palace: palatial furnishings.
2. Of the nature of a palace, as in spaciousness or ornateness: a palatial yacht.

[From Latin Palātium, imperial residence; see palace.]

pa·la′tial·ly adv.
pa·la′tial·ness n.

palatial

(pəˈleɪʃəl)
adj
of, resembling, or suitable for a palace; sumptuous
paˈlatially adv
paˈlatialness n

pa•la•tial

(pəˈleɪ ʃəl)

adj.
1. pertaining to or resembling a palace: a palatial house.
2. suitable for a palace; magnificent.
[1745–55; < Latin palāti(um) palace + -al1]
pa•la′tial•ly, adv.
pa•la′tial•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.palatial - relating to or being a palace; "the palatial residence"
2.palatial - suitable for or like a palace; "palatial furnishings"; "a palatial yacht"
impressive - making a strong or vivid impression; "an impressive ceremony"

palatial

adjective magnificent, grand, imposing, splendid, gorgeous, luxurious, spacious, majestic, regal, stately, sumptuous, plush (informal), illustrious, grandiose, opulent, de luxe, splendiferous (facetious) a palatial Hollywood mansion

palatial

adjective
Characterized by extravagant, ostentatious magnificence:
Informal: plushy.
Translations
فَخْم، جَليل
honosnýpalácový
herskabelig
palotaszerű
mikilfenglegur; líkastur höll
honosný
saray gibi

palatial

[pəˈleɪʃəl] ADJsuntuoso, espléndido

palatial

[pəˈleɪʃəl] adj [home, mansion] → grandiose, magnifique

palatial

adj (= spacious)palastartig; (= luxurious)luxuriös, prunkvoll, feudal (hum inf)

palatial

[pəˈleɪʃl] adjsontuoso/a, sfarzoso/a

palace

(ˈpӕləs) noun
a large and magnificent house, especially one lived in by a king or queen. Buckingham Palace.
palatial (pəˈleiʃəl) adjective
large and magnificent, as (in) a palace. They lived in a palatial house; palatial rooms.
References in classic literature ?
Meanwhile the man, having laid his wife in a chamber palatial in comparison with that which the storm had blown about her ears, was congratulating her on her luck, and threatening the children with the most violent chastisement if they failed to behave themselves with strict propriety whilst they remained in that house.
From his exalted position Passepartout observed with much curiosity the wide streets, the low, evenly ranged houses, the Anglo-Saxon Gothic churches, the great docks, the palatial wooden and brick warehouses, the numerous conveyances, omnibuses, horse-cars, and upon the side-walks, not only Americans and Europeans, but Chinese and Indians.
Such is the king to whom Viking chieftains bowed their heads, and whom the modern and palatial steamship defies with impunity seven times a week.
The greater then was my surprise to enter a hall paved in black and white marble and in its dimness appearing of palatial proportions.
All our exclusive citizens will recall the Perambulator Parade Dinner, in which Last-Trick Todd, at his palatial home at Pilgrim's Pond, caused so many of our prominent debutantes to look even younger than their years.
From earliest infancy it had been a cherished ambition of mine to be shaved some day in a palatial barber- shop in Paris.
The talk soon centred down to business, though Guggenhammer had first to say his say about the forthcoming international yacht race and about his own palatial steam yacht, the Electra, whose recent engines were already antiquated.
Evenings during the week he took her to see plays in which the brain-clutching heroine was rescued from the palatial home of her guardian, who is cruelly after her bonds, by the hero with the beautiful sentiments.
It was a large window, forming part of the long facade of a gilt and palatial public-house; it was the part reserved for respectable dining, and labelled "Restaurant.
The apartment was lofty and of almost palatial proportions.
There it was, too, within a stone's throw of the Harbour Office, low, but somehow palatial, displaying its white, pillared pavilions surrounded by trim grass plots.
That envoy found her on a little square of carpet, so extremely diminutive in reference to the size of her stone and marble floor that she looked as if she might have had it spread for the trying on of a ready-made pair of shoes; or as if she had come into possession of the enchanted piece of carpet, bought for forty purses by one of the three princes in the Arabian Nights, and had that moment been transported on it, at a wish, into a palatial saloon with which it had no connection.