palliate


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pal·li·ate

 (păl′ē-āt′)
tr.v. pal·li·at·ed, pal·li·at·ing, pal·li·ates
1.
a. To make less severe or intense; mitigate. See Synonyms at relieve.
b. To alleviate the symptoms of (a disease or disorder).
2. To make (an offense or crime) seem less serious; extenuate.

[Middle English palliaten, from Late Latin palliāre, palliāt-, to cloak, palliate, from Latin pallium, cloak.]

pal′li·a′tion n.
pal′li·a′tor n.

palliate

(ˈpælɪˌeɪt)
vb (tr)
1. to lessen the severity of (pain, disease, etc) without curing or removing; alleviate; mitigate
2. to cause (an offence) to seem less serious by concealing evidence; extenuate
[C16: from Late Latin palliāre to cover up, from Latin pallium a cloak, pallium]
ˌpalliˈation n
ˈpalliˌator n

pal•li•ate

(ˈpæl iˌeɪt)

v.t. -at•ed, -at•ing.
1. to relieve without curing; mitigate; alleviate: to palliate a chronic disease.
2. to try to mitigate or conceal the gravity of (an offense) by excuses, apologies, etc.; extenuate.
[1540–50; < Late Latin palliātus cloaked, covered. See pallium, -ate1]
pal`li•a′tion, n.
pal′li•a`tor, n.

palliate


Past participle: palliated
Gerund: palliating

Imperative
palliate
palliate
Present
I palliate
you palliate
he/she/it palliates
we palliate
you palliate
they palliate
Preterite
I palliated
you palliated
he/she/it palliated
we palliated
you palliated
they palliated
Present Continuous
I am palliating
you are palliating
he/she/it is palliating
we are palliating
you are palliating
they are palliating
Present Perfect
I have palliated
you have palliated
he/she/it has palliated
we have palliated
you have palliated
they have palliated
Past Continuous
I was palliating
you were palliating
he/she/it was palliating
we were palliating
you were palliating
they were palliating
Past Perfect
I had palliated
you had palliated
he/she/it had palliated
we had palliated
you had palliated
they had palliated
Future
I will palliate
you will palliate
he/she/it will palliate
we will palliate
you will palliate
they will palliate
Future Perfect
I will have palliated
you will have palliated
he/she/it will have palliated
we will have palliated
you will have palliated
they will have palliated
Future Continuous
I will be palliating
you will be palliating
he/she/it will be palliating
we will be palliating
you will be palliating
they will be palliating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been palliating
you have been palliating
he/she/it has been palliating
we have been palliating
you have been palliating
they have been palliating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been palliating
you will have been palliating
he/she/it will have been palliating
we will have been palliating
you will have been palliating
they will have been palliating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been palliating
you had been palliating
he/she/it had been palliating
we had been palliating
you had been palliating
they had been palliating
Conditional
I would palliate
you would palliate
he/she/it would palliate
we would palliate
you would palliate
they would palliate
Past Conditional
I would have palliated
you would have palliated
he/she/it would have palliated
we would have palliated
you would have palliated
they would have palliated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.palliate - lessen or to try to lessen the seriousness or extent ofpalliate - lessen or to try to lessen the seriousness or extent of; "The circumstances extenuate the crime"
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
apologise, rationalize, apologize, rationalise, justify, excuse - defend, explain, clear away, or make excuses for by reasoning; "rationalize the child's seemingly crazy behavior"; "he rationalized his lack of success"
2.palliate - provide physical relief, as from painpalliate - provide physical relief, as from pain; "This pill will relieve your headaches"
soothe - cause to feel better; "the medicine soothes the pain of the inflammation"
comfort, ease - lessen pain or discomfort; alleviate; "ease the pain in your legs"
ameliorate, improve, meliorate, amend, better - to make better; "The editor improved the manuscript with his changes"

palliate

verb
1. To conceal or make light of a fault or offense:
2. To make less severe or more bearable:
Translations

palliate

[ˈpælɪeɪt] VT (frm) → paliar, mitigar

palliate

vt (form)
diseaselindern
offence, seriousness of situation (= make less serious)mildern; (= make seem less serious)beschönigen
References in classic literature ?
Cora remained silent, for she knew not how to palliate this imprudent severity on the part of her father in a manner to suit the comprehension of an Indian.
The young clergyman, after a few hours of privacy, was sensible that the disorder of his nerves had hurried him into an unseemly outbreak of temper, which there had been nothing in the physician's words to excuse or palliate.
His companions suggested only what could palliate imprudence, or smooth objections; and by the time they had talked it all over together, and he had talked it all over again with Emma, in their walk back to Hartfield, he was become perfectly reconciled, and not far from thinking it the very best thing that Frank could possibly have done.
Yes, yes, you are right," said he; "I have plenty of faults of my own: I know it, and I don't wish to palliate them, I assure you.
Being subjects either of an absolute or limited monarchy, they have endeavored to heighten the advantages, or palliate the evils of those forms, by placing in comparison the vices and defects of the republican, and by citing as specimens of the latter the turbulent democracies of ancient Greece and modern Italy.
For no other purpose but to see Alan would he have entered a billiard-room; but he had desired to palliate the fact of his disobedience, and now it appeared that he frequented these disreputable haunts upon his own account.
I will not say that their foes are the aggressors, nor will I endeavour to palliate their conduct.
To her and her like, birth itself was an ordeal of degrading personal compulsion, whose gratuitousness nothing in the result seemed to justify, and at best could only palliate.
Bulstrode, which on the one hand would have inclined her to desire that the mildest view of his character should be the true one, but on the other, made her the more afraid of seeming to palliate his culpability.
We may palliate them or excuse them for this reason or that, but that is the truth, and I do not see why they should not be dropped from literature, as they were long ago dropped from the talk of decent people.
He did not disguise it to himself, nor attempt to palliate it.
While trying to palliate these misdeeds, the defendant's Attorney turned suddenly to the Judge, saying: