palpability


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pal·pa·ble

 (păl′pə-bəl)
adj.
1.
a. Capable of being handled, touched, or felt; tangible: "Anger rushed out in a palpable wave through his arms and legs" (Herman Wouk).
b. Medicine Capable of being felt by palpating: a palpable tumor.
2. Easily perceived; obvious: "There was a palpable sense of expectation in the court" (Nelson DeMille). See Synonyms at perceptible.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Late Latin palpābilis, from Latin palpāre, to touch gently; see pāl- in Indo-European roots.]

pal′pa·bil′i·ty n.
pal′pa·bly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.palpability - the quality of being perceivable by touch
corporality, corporeality, physicalness, materiality - the quality of being physical; consisting of matter
impalpability, intangibility, intangibleness - the quality of being intangible and not perceptible by touch

palpability

noun
The quality or condition of being discernible by touch:
References in classic literature ?
A half-formed, wholly unexpressed suspicion tossed in it, now heaving itself up, and now sinking into the deep; now gaining palpability, and now losing it.
Bundled together, they give social life--and our consciousness of it--its apparent solidity, its palpability, its reality and its actuality (p.
However, processing of this muscle into final products for instance, ready-to-eat products with high nutritional value, typical palpability and convenience to use is necessary to add value to this muscle far beyond its usual profitability.
If we expand the understanding of rhythm beyond linguistic concretes such as syllables and beats, we may lose touch with the palpability of the signifier, where much of our understanding of rhythm seems located.
Because through repetition, collocation, combination, alliteration, rhyme, assonance, rhythm, redundancy or parallelism --through metonymic strategies--it draws attention to the weft itself of text, formulaic discourse partakes of the poetic function of language in that it 'projects the principle of equivalence from the axis of selection onto the axis of combination', focuses on the message itself and promotes what Jakobson (1960: 71) called 'the palpability of signs'.
Although much of the story remains ambiguous (a "choose your own ending," claimed some reviewers), the action, much of it terrifying, lends the story palpability.
Mana in Christian Fiji: The Interconversion of Intelligibility and Palpability.
Previously, patients with this rare problem had to have their breast implant relocated within the same breast, which created a higher risk of wrinkling, rippling, palpability and implant migration, especially in thin patients.
The maps of the Alice and Oz books can diagnose the structure of their world and orient us, but they are ultimately more for the convenience of the teller than to reaffirm some deep subcreative palpability on the part of the tale.
6) In addition to advanced stage, it has also been suggested that tumor palpability and the presence of synaptophysin may indicate a worse prognosis.
It seems as though historians have equated the palpability of Turner's ideas, which appealed to America's sense of exceptionalism, with authority.
The palpability of their images is strikingly unlike any imagined "phantom": the flower garden that the Fugitive plants to woo Faustine is demolished when Morel steps through it: the image, more palpable than actuality, obliterates the real.