pampered


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pam·per

 (păm′pər)
tr.v. pam·pered, pam·per·ing, pam·pers
1. To treat with excessive indulgence: pampered their child.
2. To give in to; gratify: He pampered his ambition for wealth and fame.
3. Archaic To indulge with rich food; glut.

[Middle English pamperen, probably of Low German origin.]

pam′per·er n.
Synonyms: pamper, indulge, humor, spoil, coddle, mollycoddle, baby
These verbs all mean to cater excessively to someone or to his or her desires or feelings. To pamper is to gratify appetites, tastes, or desires: "tempting stores of everything to stimulate and pamper the sated appetite and give new relish to the oft-repeated feast" (Charles Dickens).
Indulge suggests a kindly or excessive lenience in yielding especially to wishes or impulses better left unfulfilled: "You mustn't think because I indulge you in some things that you can keep everyone waiting" (Theodore Dreiser).
Humor implies compliance with or accommodation to another's mood or idiosyncrasies: "Human life is ... but like a froward child, that must be played with and humored a little to keep it quiet till it falls asleep" (William Temple).
Spoil implies excessive indulgence that adversely affects the character, nature, or attitude: "My pupil was a lively child, who had been spoiled and indulged, and, therefore, was sometimes wayward" (Charlotte Brontë).
Coddle and mollycoddle point to tender, overprotective care that often leads to weakening of character: "The two or three times a week she was home, she coddled Lisette, painting her toenails and rubbing rose-scented lotion into her legs" (Erin McGraw)."His mother mollycoddled the boy, combed and curled his hair, trimmed and tidied his clothes" (Patrick MacGill).
Baby suggests the indulgence and attention one might give to an infant: "Though he was grown, she still babied him, kept his school pictures taped to her refrigerator, still bought his clothes on sale, still saved money for him" (Louise Erdrich).

pampered

(ˈpæmpəd)
adj
treated with affectionate and usually excessive indulgence; coddled; spoiled
Translations

pampered

[ˈpæmpəd] ADJ [child etc] → mimado, consentido; [life] → regalado
he had a pampered childhoodse crió entre algodones

pampered

[ˈpæmpərd] adjdorloté(e)

pampered

a. pp. de to pamper, mimado-a, consentido-a.
References in classic literature ?
Tell us whether, after all, the half- free colored man of Massachusetts is worse off than the pampered slave of the rice swamps!
It's the best thing that could happen to the sickly pampered thing to have some one to stand up to him that's as spoiled as himself;" and she laughed into her handkerchief again.
Joe called "Pompeyed," or (as I render it) pampered.
He returned pampered and proud, to tell his rapacious countrymen of the wealth and the simplicity of the Saxon nobles a folly, oh, Athelstane, foreboded of old, as well as foreseen, by those descendants of Hengist and his hardy tribes, who retained the simplicity of their manners.
Well, you have done well enough for to-day,' she grumbled; 'but to-morrow you'll have something more difficult to do, and if you don't do it well, you pampered brats, straight into the oven you go.
He often tried to dismiss the question, but his body persisted in rebellion and his senses nagged at him like pampered babies.
This slavish homage, instead of softening my heart, only pampered whatever was stern and exacting in its mood.
The huge mastif that has been already mentioned, appeared from his kennel, gaping and stretching himself with pampered laziness; but as his mistress again called:
The snake in his bosom seemed the symbol of a monstrous egotism to which everything was referred, and which he pampered, night and day, with a continual and exclusive sacrifice of devil worship.
Another valet, with his finger over the mouth of a bottle, was sprinkling Eau de Cologne on the Emperor's pampered body with an expression which seemed to say that he alone knew where and how much Eau de Cologne should be sprinkled.
Audiences like to believe that the animals enjoy doing their tricks, and that they are treated like pampered darlings, and that they just love their masters to death.
In courageous work, Carlyle declares, work whether physical or mental, lies the way of salvation not only for pampered idlers but for sincere souls who are perplexed and wearied with over-much meditation on the mysteries of the universe, 'Be no, longer a Chaos,' he urges, 'but a World, or even Worldkin.