panacea


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pan·a·ce·a

 (păn′ə-sē′ə)
n.
A remedy for all diseases, evils, or difficulties; a cure-all.

[Latin panacēa, from Greek panakeia, from panakēs, all-healing : pan-, pan- + akos, cure.]

pan′a·ce′an adj.

panacea

(ˌpænəˈsɪə)
n
1. a remedy for all diseases or ills
[C16: via Latin from Greek panakeia healing everything, from pan all + akēs remedy]
ˌpanaˈcean adj

pan•a•ce•a

(ˌp?n əˈsi ə)

n., pl. -ce•as.
1. a remedy for all ills; cure-all.
2. a solution for all difficulties.
[1540–50; < Latin < Greek panakeia=panake-, s. of panakḗs all-healing]
pan`a•ce′an, adj.

panacea

a cure-all or universal remedy; an elixir. — panacean, adj.
See also: Remedies
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Panacea - (Greek mythology) the goddess of healing; daughter of Aesculapius and sister of Hygeia
2.panacea - hypothetical remedy for all ills or diseases; once sought by the alchemists
curative, cure, therapeutic, remedy - a medicine or therapy that cures disease or relieve pain
elixir - a substance believed to cure all ills

panacea

noun cure-all, elixir, nostrum, heal-all, sovereign remedy, universal cure Western aid will not be a panacea for the country's problems.
Translations

panacea

[ˌpænəˈsɪə] Npanacea f

panacea

[ˌpænəˈsiːə] n (= cure-all) → panacee f
a panacea for sth → une panacee pour qch

panacea

nAllheilmittel nt; there’s no universal panacea for …es gibt kein Allheilmittel fur …

panacea

[pænəˈsɪə] npanacea

pan·a·ce·a

n. panacea, remedio para todas las enfermedades.
References in classic literature ?
His panacea was somewhat in the nature of an anti-climax, but at least it had the merits of simplicity and of common sense.
Poor Hannah was the first to recover, and with unconscious wisdom she set all the rest a good example, for with her, work was panacea for most afflictions.
For my panacea, instead of one of those quack vials of a mixture dipped from Acheron and the Dead Sea, which come out of those long shallow black-schooner looking wagons which we sometimes see made to carry bottles, let me have a draught of undiluted morning air.