pandects


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pan·dect

 (păn′dĕkt′)
n.
1. Pandects A digest of Roman civil law, compiled for the emperor Justinian in the sixth century ad and part of the Corpus Juris Civilis. Also called Digest.
2. The definitive statement of a legal rule.

[Latin pandectēs, encyclopedia, from Greek pandektēs, all-receiving : pan-, pan- + dektēs, receiver (from dekhesthai, to receive, accept; see dek- in Indo-European roots).]

pandect, pandects

a legal code or complete body or system of laws.
See also: Law
References in classic literature ?
They have provided a system which for terse comprehensiveness surpasses Justinian's Pandects and the By-laws of the Chinese Society for the Suppression of Meddling with other People's Business.
Boccaccio openly quotes the Digest in his Genealogia, recalling that in the book, which he refers to as Pandecta pisana (the oldest manuscript of the Pandects, during that period held in Pisa),
1726) (translated in PERCIVAL GANE, THE SELECTIVE VOET: BEING THE COMMENTARY ON THE PANDECTS, PARIS EDITION OF 1829 (1955)).
The most famous was the Digest, a rewriting of previous law, and the Pandects, a systematic compilation of Justinian's own edicts.
Some confusion results as Marx, only a few years away from his Berlin studies of the pandects and jurisprudence, attempts to solve the problem.
Digests or Pandects, compiled the writings of the great Roman jurists