panic


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Related to panic: panic attack

pan·ic

 (păn′ĭk)
n.
1. A sudden, overpowering feeling of fear, often affecting many people at once. See Synonyms at fear.
2. A state of extreme anxiety, such as that involved in a panic attack.
3.
a. A state of frantic activity, usually accompanied by extreme concern or anxiety: The office was in a panic as the deadline approached.
b. A sudden widespread alarm concerning finances, often resulting in a rush to sell property to raise cash.
4. Slang A person or thing that is considered extremely funny.
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or resulting from sudden, overwhelming terror: panic flight.
2. Of or resulting from a financial panic: panic selling of securities.
3. often Panic Mythology Of or relating to Pan.
tr. & intr.v. pan·icked, pan·ick·ing, pan·ics
To affect or be affected with panic. See Synonyms at frighten.

[From French panique, terrified, from Greek Pānikos, of Pan (a source of terror, as in flocks or herds), groundless (used of fear), from Pān, Pan; see Pan.]

pan′ick·y adj.

panic

(ˈpænɪk)
n
1. a sudden overwhelming feeling of terror or anxiety, esp one affecting a whole group of people
2. (modifier) of or resulting from such terror: panic measures.
vb, -ics, -icking or -icked
to feel or cause to feel panic
[C17: from French panique, from New Latin pānicus, from Greek panikos emanating from Pan, considered as the source of irrational fear]
ˈpanicky adj

Panic

(ˈpænɪk)
adj
(Classical Myth & Legend) of or relating to the god Pan

pan•ic1

(ˈpæn ɪk)

n., adj., v. -icked, -ick•ing. n.
1. a sudden overwhelming fear that produces hysterical behavior and that can spread quickly through a crowd.
2. an instance, outbreak, or period of such fear.
3. an anxiety disorder characterized by feelings of impending doom and physical symptoms such as trembling and hyperventilation.
4. a sudden widespread fear that the economy is faltering, causing stock values to fall and some banks to fail, as investments and savings are hastily withdrawn.
5. Informal. someone or something that is considered hilariously funny.
adj.
6. of the nature of, caused by, or indicating panic: panic selling of stocks.
7. (cap.) of or pertaining to the god Pan.
v.t.
8. to affect with panic.
9. Informal. to keep (an audience or the like) highly amused.
v.i.
10. to be stricken with panic; become frantic with fear.
[1595–1605; earlier panique < French < Greek Panikós of Pan; see -ic]
pan′ick•y, adj.

pan•ic2

(ˈpæn ɪk)

n.
any grass of the genus Panicum, many species of which bear edible grain. Also called pan′ic grass`.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Latin pānicum a kind of millet]

panic


Past participle: panicked
Gerund: panicking

Imperative
panic
panic
Present
I panic
you panic
he/she/it panics
we panic
you panic
they panic
Preterite
I panicked
you panicked
he/she/it panicked
we panicked
you panicked
they panicked
Present Continuous
I am panicking
you are panicking
he/she/it is panicking
we are panicking
you are panicking
they are panicking
Present Perfect
I have panicked
you have panicked
he/she/it has panicked
we have panicked
you have panicked
they have panicked
Past Continuous
I was panicking
you were panicking
he/she/it was panicking
we were panicking
you were panicking
they were panicking
Past Perfect
I had panicked
you had panicked
he/she/it had panicked
we had panicked
you had panicked
they had panicked
Future
I will panic
you will panic
he/she/it will panic
we will panic
you will panic
they will panic
Future Perfect
I will have panicked
you will have panicked
he/she/it will have panicked
we will have panicked
you will have panicked
they will have panicked
Future Continuous
I will be panicking
you will be panicking
he/she/it will be panicking
we will be panicking
you will be panicking
they will be panicking
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been panicking
you have been panicking
he/she/it has been panicking
we have been panicking
you have been panicking
they have been panicking
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been panicking
you will have been panicking
he/she/it will have been panicking
we will have been panicking
you will have been panicking
they will have been panicking
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been panicking
you had been panicking
he/she/it had been panicking
we had been panicking
you had been panicking
they had been panicking
Conditional
I would panic
you would panic
he/she/it would panic
we would panic
you would panic
they would panic
Past Conditional
I would have panicked
you would have panicked
he/she/it would have panicked
we would have panicked
you would have panicked
they would have panicked
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.panic - an overwhelming feeling of fear and anxietypanic - an overwhelming feeling of fear and anxiety
fear, fearfulness, fright - an emotion experienced in anticipation of some specific pain or danger (usually accompanied by a desire to flee or fight)
swivet - a panic or extreme discomposure; "it threw her into a swivet"
2.panic - sudden mass fear and anxiety over anticipated eventspanic - sudden mass fear and anxiety over anticipated events; "panic in the stock market"; "a war scare"; "a bomb scare led them to evacuate the building"
anxiety, anxiousness - (psychiatry) a relatively permanent state of worry and nervousness occurring in a variety of mental disorders, usually accompanied by compulsive behavior or attacks of panic
red scare - a period of general fear of communists
Verb1.panic - be overcome by a sudden fear; "The students panicked when told that final exams were less than a week away"
dread, fear - be afraid or scared of; be frightened of; "I fear the winters in Moscow"; "We should not fear the Communists!"
freak, freak out, gross out - lose one's nerve; "When he saw the accident, he freaked out"
2.panic - cause sudden fear in or fill with sudden panic; "The mere thought of an isolation cell panicked the prisoners"
terrify, terrorise, terrorize - fill with terror; frighten greatly

panic

noun
1. fear, alarm, horror, terror, anxiety, dismay, hysteria, fright, agitation, consternation, trepidation, a flap (informal) The earthquake has caused panic among the population.
verb
1. go to pieces, overreact, become hysterical, have kittens (informal), lose your nerve, be terror-stricken, lose your bottle (Brit. slang) The guests panicked and screamed when the bomb went off.
2. alarm, scare, terrify, startle, unnerve The dogs were panicked by the noise.

panic

noun
1. Great agitation and anxiety caused by the expectation or the realization of danger:
Slang: cold feet.
Idiom: fear and trembling.
2. Slang. Something or someone uproariously funny or absurd:
Informal: hoot, joke, laugh, scream.
Slang: gas, howl, riot.
verb
To fill with fear:
Archaic: fright.
Idioms: make one's blood run cold, make one's hair stand on end, scare silly, scare the daylights out of.
Translations
ذُعْرٌذُعْر، رُعبيَرْتَعِب، يُذْعَريُصِيبُ بِالْذُّعْرِ
panikapanikařitzpanikařit
panikblive grebet af panikforskrækkegå i panik
paniikkijoutua paniikkiin
paničaritipanika
pánikpánikba esik
skelfastskelfing, ofsahræîsla
うろたえるパニック
공포공포에 사로잡히다
įpulti į panikąpaniškaspasiduodantis panikaipulti į paniką
krist panikāpanika
panikaspanikovať
panika
panikgripas av panik
ความหวาดกลัวหรือวิตกกังวลทำให้ตื่นตกใจ
hoảng sợsự hoảng sợ

panic

[ˈpænɪk] (panicked (vb: pt, pp))
A. N
1. (= fear) → pánico m
an earthquake hit the capital, spreading panic among the populationun terremoto azotó la capital, sembrando el pánico entre la población
to be in a (state of) panicser presa del pánico
I phoned my mum in a panicllamé a mi madre muerto de miedo, llamé a mi madre presa del pánico
a patient rang me in a state of panic because her baby had swallowed a keyme llamó una paciente muy asustada porque su hijo se había tragado una llave
I was in a blind panicestaba ofuscado por el pánico
to flee in panichuir aterrado, huir presa del pánico
if I asked the simplest question, she would go into or get into a panicsi le hacía la pregunta más simple le entraba el pánico
to send or throw sb into a panic her sudden arrival threw him into a panicsu inesperada llegado hizo que le entrase el pánico
the country was thrown into a paniccundió el pánico en el país
the explosion threw the crowd into a panicla explosión provocó el pánico entre la multitud
it was panic stationsreinaba el pánico
2. (= rush) there's no panic, tomorrow will dono es que haya prisa, mañana vale
we've had a bit of a panic on here and it slipped my mind till nowhemos ido un poco de cabeza por aquí y se me ha olvidado hasta ahora
B. VIdejarse llevar por el pánico
I refused to panicme negué a dejarme llevar por el pánico
industry is panicking about the recessionla recesión tiene a la industria presa del pánico
don't panic!¡calma!, ¡cálmate!
don't panic, sit still and keep calmno te dejes llevar por el pánico, quédate sentado y mantén la calma
C. VT [+ crowd, population] → provocar el pánico entre; [+ person] → provocar or infundir el pánico en, llenar de pánico a
the sound of the gun panicked the elephantsel sonido del rifle provocó el pánico en or entre los elefantes
he had been panicked into the decisionhabía tomado la decisión impulsado por el pánico
D. CPD panic attack Nataque m de pánico
to have a panic attacktener or sufrir un ataque de pánico
panic button N (lit) → botón m de alarma
to press or hit or push the panic button (fig) → perder el control or la calma
panic buying N panic buying has caused shortages of some foodstuffslas compras provocadas por el pánico han provocado escasez de algunos alimentos
panic measures NPLmedidas fpl inducidas por el pánico
panic reaction Nreacción f motivada por el pánico

panic

[ˈpænɪk]
npanique f
a feeling of panic → un sentiment de panique
I had an overwhelming feeling of panic → Un sentiment de panique s'empara de moi.
to cause panic → causer la panique
to start a panic → provoquer une panique
We didn't want to start a panic on the Stock Exchange → Nous ne voulions pas provoquer une panique à la Bourse.
to be in a panic → être complètement paniqué(e)
She's in a panic about her exams next week → Elle est complètement paniquée à cause de ses examens la semaine prochaine.
He rang in a panic when the car broke down → Il a appelé, complètement paniqué, lorsque la voiture est tombée en panne.
to get into a panic → paniquer panic alarm, panic button, panic reaction
vipaniquer
Don't panic! → Ne paniquez pas !
to panic about sth, to panic over sth → paniquer à cause de qch
vtpaniquerpanic alarm ndispositif m d'alarmepanic attack ncrise f de paniquepanic button nbouton m d'alarme
to press the panic button, to hit the panic button (fig)céder à la paniquepanic buying nachats mpl de panique

panic

vb: pret, ptp <panicked>
nPanik f; panic on the stock exchangeBörsenpanik f; in a (blind) panicin (heller) Panik; to flee in panicpanikartig die Flucht ergreifen; a panic reactioneine Kurzschlussreaktion; the country was thrown into a (state of) panicdas Land wurde von Panik erfasst; panic buying/selling (esp St Ex) → Panikkäufe pl/-verkäufe pl; (of goods also)Hamsterkäufe pl/Angstverkäufe pl; to hit the panic button (fig inf: = panic) → in Panik geraten, durchdrehen (inf)
viin Panik geraten; don’t panicnur keine Panik!
vtPanik auslösen unter (+dat); to panic somebody into doing somethingjdn veranlassen, etw überstürzt zu tun

panic

:
panic-mongering
n (pej)Panikmache f (pej)
panic-stricken, panic-struck
adjvon panischem Schrecken ergriffen; lookpanisch

panic

[ˈpænɪk]
1. npanico
to get into a panic about sth → farsi prendere dal panico per qc
to throw into a panic (crowd) → seminare il panico tra (person) → gettare in uno stato di agitazione
2. vilasciarsi prendere dal panico
don't panic! → non agitarti!

panic

(ˈpӕnik) noun
(a) sudden great fear, especially that spreads through a crowd etc. The fire caused a panic in the city.
verbpast tense, past participle ˈpanicked
to make or become so frightened that one loses the power to think clearly. He panicked at the sight of the audience.
ˈpanicky adjective
inclined to panic. She gets panicky in an exam; in a panicky mood.

panic

ذُعْرٌ, يُصِيبُ بِالْذُّعْرِ panika, panikařit gå i panik, panik in Panik geraten, Panik πανικοβάλλομαι, πανικός entrar en pánico, pánico joutua paniikkiin, paniikki panique, paniquer paničariti, panika lasciarsi prendere dal panico, panico うろたえる, パニック 공포, 공포에 사로잡히다 in paniek raken, paniek få panikk, panikk panika, spanikować entrar em pânico, pânico паника, паниковать gripas av panik, panik ความหวาดกลัวหรือวิตกกังวล, ทำให้ตื่นตกใจ paniğe kapılmak, panik hoảng sợ, sự hoảng sợ 惊慌

pan·ic

n. pánico, temor excesivo, angustia;
___ attacksataques de angustia;
to be terribly afraidtener un miedo excesivo;
v. tener un miedo excesivo; sobrecogerse de miedo.

panic

n pánico
References in classic literature ?
Meg got behind his chair under pretense of smoothing the wrinkles out of his tired forehead, and standing there, she said, with her panic increasing with every word .
There was a panic among some of the passengers, and a few excited men behaved in a way that caused prompt action on the part of the first officer, who drove them back to the main cabin under threat of a revolver.
Here was held another short but earnest consultation, during which the horses, to whose panic their owners ascribed their heaviest misfortune, were led from the cover of the woods, and brought to the sheltered spot.
In her eyes was the same look he had seen in the eyes of men who, at times of panic, fled to him, beseeching, entreating, forcing upon him what was left of the wreck of their fortunes, if only he would save their honor.
Children are even more apt, if possible, than grown people, to catch the contagion of a panic terror.
As yet the panic of the steed had given his unskilful rider an apparent advantage in the chase, but just as he had got half way through the hollow, the girths of the saddle gave way, and he felt it slipping from under him.
Thus, while in life the great whale's body may have been a real terror to his foes, in his death his ghost becomes a powerless panic to a world.
The cause of the panic had been the attempt of a policeman to arrest a drunken man in a saloon next door, which had drawn a crowd at the hour the people were on their way to work, and so started the "run.
For I was sick, almost to death; and when, through the panic, everybody else fled, Scipio worked for me like a giant, and actually brought me back into life again.
It soon transpired that the eclipse had scared the British world almost to death; that while it lasted the whole country, from one end to the other, was in a pitiable state of panic, and the churches, hermitages, and monkeries overflowed with praying and weeping poor creatures who thought the end of the world was come.
Miss Woodhouse was so great a personage in Highbury, that the prospect of the introduction had given as much panic as pleasure; but the humble, grateful little girl went off with highly gratified feelings, delighted with the affability with which Miss Woodhouse had treated her all the evening, and actually shaken hands with her at last!
There was panic on every side, and dying people in all the bungalows.