panic disorder


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panic disorder

n.
An anxiety disorder characterized by recurrent panic attacks and fear of further attacks. The panic attacks are typically not triggered by any specific situation, but some people also experience attacks that are associated with specific triggers.

panic disorder

n
(Psychiatry) psychiatry a condition in which a person experiences recurrent panic attacks
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.panic disorder - an anxiety disorder characterized by unpredictable panic attackspanic disorder - an anxiety disorder characterized by unpredictable panic attacks; the attacks are usually severe but brief
anxiety disorder - a cover term for a variety of mental disorders in which severe anxiety is a salient symptom
References in periodicals archive ?
A regional perspective Dr Linda Sakr, a UAE-based counselling psychologist formerly based at Dubai Community Health Centre for more than ten years, said roughly 20 per cent of the patients she deals with carry a diagnosis of panic disorder, which is "common and prevalent" in both the expatriate and the local Emirati community.
Lifetime incidence rates of panic disorder are 1% to 3% for the general population.
Panic disorder with agoraphobia can be conceptualised as fear of fear (FOF), or a tendency to respond fearfully to benign bodily sensations, and figures remarkably in several theoretical accounts of PDA.
According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, the prevalence of panic disorder in general population in several European countries and in USA is about 2-3%.
The present study aimed to determine the incidence rate of pregnancy-onset panic disorder (POPD) among Turkish pregnant women using a diagnostic interview.
The epidemiology of panic attacks, panic disorder, and agoraphobia in the National Comorbidity Survey Replication.
8220;In my thirty-year long career I am proud to have successfully treated over 5,000 panic disorder patients.
Those who were both bullies and victims had higher levels of all anxiety and depressive disorders, plus the highest levels of suicidal thoughts, depressive disorders, generalized anxiety, and panic disorder.
Having a sufficient vitamin D level of at least 30 ng/mL at the age of 45 was associated with a 43% lower adjusted risk of depression and a 67% lower risk of having panic disorder in comparison with subjects whose levels were less than 10 ng/mL.
Joint hypermobility is far more prevalent among patients with panic disorder than in the general population.