pantheism


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Related to pantheism: Panentheism

pan·the·ism

 (păn′thē-ĭz′əm)
n.
1. A doctrine identifying the Deity with the universe and its phenomena.
2. Belief in and worship of all gods.

pan′the·ist n.
pan′the·is′tic, pan′the·is′ti·cal adj.
pan′the·is′ti·cal·ly adv.

pantheism

(ˈpænθɪˌɪzəm)
n
1. (Theology) the doctrine that God is the transcendent reality of which man, nature, and the material universe are manifestations
2. (Theology) any doctrine that regards God as identical with the material universe or the forces of nature
3. (Theology) readiness to worship all or a large number of gods
ˈpantheist n
ˌpantheˈistic, ˌpantheˈistical adj
ˌpantheˈistically adv

pan•the•ism

(ˈpæn θiˌɪz əm)

n.
1. the doctrine that God is the transcendent reality of which the material world and humanity are only manifestations.
2. any religious belief or philosophical doctrine that identifies God with the universe.
[1725–35; < French panthéisme]
pan′the•ist, n.
pan`the•is′tic, pan`the•is′ti•cal, adj.
pan`the•is′ti•cal•ly, adv.

pantheism

1. the belief that identifies God with the universe.
2. the belief that God is the only reality, transcending all, and that the universe and everything in it are mere manifestations of Him. — pantheist, n., adj.pantheistic, adj.
See also: Religion
the identification of God with the universe as His manifestation. — pantheist, n.
See also: God and Gods
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pantheism - (rare) worship that admits or tolerates all gods
theism - the doctrine or belief in the existence of a God or gods
2.pantheism - the doctrine or belief that God is the universe and its phenomena (taken or conceived of as a whole) or the doctrine that regards the universe as a manifestation of God
theism - the doctrine or belief in the existence of a God or gods
Translations
panteismus
panteisme
panteismo
panteismi
panteizam
algyðistrú
panteisme
panteizm
panteism
panteizmus
panteism
panteizm
泛神論

pantheism

[ˈpænθiːɪzəm] Npanteísmo m

pantheism

[ˈpænθiɪzəm] npanthéisme m

pantheism

nPantheismus m

pantheism

[ˈpænθɪˌɪzm] npanteismo
References in classic literature ?
Pantheism is the child of light; mist engenders faith in near protectors.
It has degenerated into pantheism, but has again emerged.
It represents a middle position between pantheism and classical theism.
His work is not infused with a reverent pantheism nor does it overtly seek objective correlatives for a literal-as-metaphorical bilingualism; it does, however, share a willingness to allow life to lead to perceptions and knowledge that would otherwise be missed by the arrogating methods of the current avant-garde who appropriate the actual and force upon it a plasticity to be molded by the self-centered imagination.
Then came a huge "Nature" work, Mahler's vast Third Symphony, evoking primordial pantheism and struggling towards a unified view of creation.
Though Nagel prefers to leave divinity out of his view of things, the upshot would seem to be a not unintelligent pantheism that is reminiscent of ancient Stoicism, as well as of the cosmologies of Spinoza and Hegel: "Each of our lives is a part of the lengthy process of the universe gradually waking up and becoming aware of itself.
Likewise, the Roman Empire grew for 700 years on pantheism before it adopted Christianity, one of Norenzayan's big religions.
Modern ethnologists often avoid this broad usage in favor of more specific and less potentially offensive terms such as polytheism, shamanism, pantheism, or animism when referring to traditional or historical faiths.
In their departure from Hegel's pantheism they all rejected Christianity as an inhuman form of thought.
The broadest spectrum of Western Christianity has taken the creation component of their beliefs toward a relatively negative view of human nature, a material-spiritual dualism, and a somewhat irrational terror of paganism and pantheism.
Similarly, Potts: "vague pantheism of the universal consciousness view is not clearly defined or defended.
There seems to be a deep-seated human tendency to pantheism and idolatry that, if left unchecked, is bound to disappoint by leading us away from our natural end and eternal happiness.