pantofle


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pan·tof·fle

also pan·to·fle  (păn-tŏf′əl, -tō′fəl, -to͞o′fəl, păn′tə-fəl)
n.
A slipper.

[Middle English pantufle, from Old French pantoufle.]

pantofle

(pænˈtɒfəl) or

pantoffle

;

pantoufle

(pænˈtuːfəl)
n
(Clothing & Fashion) archaic a kind of slipper
[C15: from French pantoufle, from Old Italian pantofola, perhaps from Medieval Greek pantophellos shoe made of cork, from panto- + phellos cork]

slip•per

(ˈslɪp ər)

n.
any light, low-cut shoe into which the foot may be easily slipped, for wear in the home, for dancing, etc.
[1470–80]
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References in periodicals archive ?
And don't get surprised if anybody asked put on your pantofles because it means slippers.
Pantofles are named after Saint Pantouffle, who appears to have been invented, for no apparent reason, in France in the 15th century.
There could be found over one thousand clothing items: gowns, robes, kirtles, foreparts, petticoats, cloaks, safeguards, and doublets, plus two hundred additional pieces of material, as well as pantofles, fans, and jewelry.