papacy

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pa·pa·cy

 (pā′pə-sē)
n. pl. pa·pa·cies
1. The office and jurisdiction of a pope.
2. The period of time during which a pope is in office.
3. A succession or line of popes: the Medici papacy.
4. Papacy Roman Catholic Church The system of church government headed by the pope.

[Middle English papacie, from Medieval Latin pāpātia, from Late Latin pāpa, pope; see pope.]

papacy

(ˈpeɪpəsɪ)
n, pl -cies
1. (Roman Catholic Church) the office or term of office of a pope
2. (Roman Catholic Church) the system of government in the Roman Catholic Church that has the pope as its head
[C14: from Medieval Latin pāpātia, from pāpa pope1]

pa•pa•cy

(ˈpeɪ pə si)

n., pl. -cies.
1. the office, dignity, or jurisdiction of the pope.
2. the system of Roman Catholic ecclesiastical government.
3. the period during which a certain pope is in office.
4. the succession or line of the popes.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Medieval Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.papacy - the government of the Roman Catholic Churchpapacy - the government of the Roman Catholic Church
authorities, government, regime - the organization that is the governing authority of a political unit; "the government reduced taxes"; "the matter was referred to higher authorities"
Translations
بابَويَّهمنصِب البابا
papežství
pavedømmepavemagt
pápaság
páfadómurpáfastjórn
pontifikataspopiežiaus valdžia
pāvesta valdīšanas laikspāvesta vara
pápežstvo

papacy

[ˈpeɪpəsɪ] Npapado m, pontificado m

papacy

[ˈpeɪpəsi] npapauté f

papacy

nPapsttum nt; during the papacy of …während der Amtszeit des Papstes …, unter Papst

papacy

[ˈpeɪpəsɪ] npapato

papacy

(ˈpeipəsi) noun
1. the position or power of the pope. The papacy is the central authority of the Roman Catholic church.
2. government by popes. the history of the papacy.
References in periodicals archive ?
For decades now, the Roman papacy has been atop the ecumenical agenda as Christians turn to popes of the first millennium to see if their papacies offer possible models of leadership that could be used today as a way around the roadblock to Christian unity that the papacy became after the eleventh-century Gregorian reforms and then especially after Vatican I in 1870.
Despite any contrasts in their styles or papacies, the two are considered to be the most beloved pontiffs of the modern papacy, and, maybe of all time.
Yet all modern papacies have ended in death - as Pope Paul VI said, "paternity cannot be resigned.