papacy


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Related to papacy: Pope

pa·pa·cy

 (pā′pə-sē)
n. pl. pa·pa·cies
1. The office and jurisdiction of a pope.
2. The period of time during which a pope is in office.
3. A succession or line of popes: the Medici papacy.
4. Papacy Roman Catholic Church The system of church government headed by the pope.

[Middle English papacie, from Medieval Latin pāpātia, from Late Latin pāpa, pope; see pope.]

papacy

(ˈpeɪpəsɪ)
n, pl -cies
1. (Roman Catholic Church) the office or term of office of a pope
2. (Roman Catholic Church) the system of government in the Roman Catholic Church that has the pope as its head
[C14: from Medieval Latin pāpātia, from pāpa pope1]

pa•pa•cy

(ˈpeɪ pə si)

n., pl. -cies.
1. the office, dignity, or jurisdiction of the pope.
2. the system of Roman Catholic ecclesiastical government.
3. the period during which a certain pope is in office.
4. the succession or line of the popes.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Medieval Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.papacy - the government of the Roman Catholic Churchpapacy - the government of the Roman Catholic Church
authorities, government, regime - the organization that is the governing authority of a political unit; "the government reduced taxes"; "the matter was referred to higher authorities"
Translations
بابَويَّهمنصِب البابا
papežství
pavedømmepavemagt
pápaság
páfadómurpáfastjórn
pontifikataspopiežiaus valdžia
pāvesta valdīšanas laikspāvesta vara
pápežstvo

papacy

[ˈpeɪpəsɪ] Npapado m, pontificado m

papacy

[ˈpeɪpəsi] npapauté f

papacy

nPapsttum nt; during the papacy of …während der Amtszeit des Papstes …, unter Papst

papacy

[ˈpeɪpəsɪ] npapato

papacy

(ˈpeipəsi) noun
1. the position or power of the pope. The papacy is the central authority of the Roman Catholic church.
2. government by popes. the history of the papacy.
References in classic literature ?
Pope Julius the Second was assisted in reaching the papacy by a reputation for liberality, yet he did not strive afterwards to keep it up, when he made war on the King of France; and he made many wars without imposing any extraordinary tax on his subjects, for he supplied his additional expenses out of his long thriftiness.
On reaching home Alexey Alexandrovitch went to his study, as he usually did, seated himself in his low chair, opened a book on the Papacy at the place where he had laid the paper-knife in it, and read till one o'clock, just as he usually did.
Early known as one of the ablest English thinkers and philosophers, he was already opposing certain doctrines and practices of the Church when he was led to become a chief spokesman for King Edward and the nation in their refusal to pay the tribute which King John, a century and a half before, had promised to the Papacy and which was now actually demanded.
This motto was sometimes applied to the Papacy, but not to the Jesuits.
To the wickedness of the Papacy humanity owes much.
Over such trivialities as these many a valuable hour may slip away, and the traveller who has gone to Italy to study the tactile values of Giotto, or the corruption of the Papacy, may return remembering nothing but the blue sky and the men and women who live under it.
Doctor," said his wife to Martin Luther, one day, "how is it that whilst subject to papacy we prayed so often and with such fervor, whilst now we pray with the utmost coldness and very seldom?
In addition, a sense of the restoration and health of the pope's body to encourage the longevity of the papacy evolved into temporary papal leaves from Rome for the summer months as a respite from heat, the contagion of malaria, or simply for recreation.
That expectation certainly lies behind the recent rush of books about the Papacy.
God's Answers to Your Questions'' likens the papacy to the beast in the book of Revelation, an ally of Satan in the world's final days.
On July 8, 2005, Ruether had sent out a press release calling for Catholics to reject the papacy of Benedict XVI.
Post shows how the rise of universities in the 12th century coincided with the assertion by the papacy of its international power and with the centralization of ecclesiastical government in the Roman Court.