papal


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pa·pal

 (pā′pəl)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or issued by a pope: the papal succession; a papal bull.
2. Of or relating to the Roman Catholic Church.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Medieval Latin pāpālis, from Late Latin pāpa, pope; see pope.]

pa′pal·ly adv.

papal

(ˈpeɪpəl)
adj
(Roman Catholic Church) of or relating to the pope or the papacy
ˈpapally adv

pa•pal

(ˈpeɪ pəl)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to the pope or the papacy.
2. of or pertaining to the Roman Catholic Church.
[1350–1400; < Medieval Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.papal - proceeding from or ordered by or subject to a pope or the papacy regarded as the successor of the Apostles; "papal dispensation"
Translations
بابَوي
papežský
pápai
páfa-, páfadóms-
popiežiaus
pāvesta
pápežský
papaya ait

papal

[ˈpeɪpəl]
A. ADJpapal, pontificio
B. CPD papal nuncio Nnuncio m apostólico

papal

[ˈpeɪpəl] adj [infallibility, blessing, throne, visit] → papal(e)
to ascent the papal throne → coiffer la tiare

papal

adjpäpstlich

papal

[ˈpeɪpl] adjpapale, pontificio/a

papal

(ˈpeipl) adjective
of the pope. papal authority.
References in classic literature ?
It is noteworthy that these two phrases, "contro alla fede" and "tutto fede," were omitted in the Testina edition, which was published with the sanction of the papal authorities.
This shows that the Papal States are as far advanced as Turkey.
To the last Lavalle was a Catholic of the old school, accepting--he who had looked into the very heart of the lightnings--the dogmas of papal infallibility, of absolution, of confession--of relics great and small.
Thorley Chivers, but who, having received a Papal title, had resumed her first husband's patronymic, and called herself the Marchioness Manson, because in Italy she could turn it into Manzoni) the little girl received an expensive but incoherent education, which included "drawing from the model," a thing never dreamed of before, and playing the piano in quintets with professional musicians.
Indeed, he had once or twice essayed to introduce the Episcopal form of service, on the Sundays that the pulpit was vacant; but Richard was a good deal addicted to carrying things to an excess, and then there was some thing so papal in his air that the greater part of his hearers deserted him on the second Sabbath—on the third his only auditor was Ben Pump, who had all the obstinate and enlightened orthodoxy of a high churchman.
At the moment when we were entering the papal gate I saw a reed warbler flit through the air, that was at the end of August; I said, it will be a hard winter.
Oh, papal it is not that," Amelia cried out, falling on his neck and kissing him many times.
Ten young descendants of Marius and the Gracchi, barefooted and out at elbows, with one hand resting on the hip and the other gracefully curved above the head, stared at the traveller, the post-chaise, and the horses; to these were added about fifty little vagabonds from the Papal States, who earned a pittance by diving into the Tiber at high water from the bridge of St.
One would almost imagine from the long list that is given of cannibal primates, bishops, arch-deacons, prebendaries, and other inferior ecclesiastics, that the sacerdotal order far outnumbered the rest of the population, and that the poor natives were more severely priest-ridden than even the inhabitants of the papal states.
But let them conceive one more historical contrast: the gigantic broken revelations of that Imperial and Papal city thrust abruptly on the notions of a girl who had been brought up in English and Swiss Puritanism, fed on meagre Protestant histories and on art chiefly of the hand-screen sort; a girl whose ardent nature turned all her small allowance of knowledge into principles, fusing her actions into their mould, and whose quick emotions gave the most abstract things the quality of a pleasure or a pain; a girl who had lately become a wife, and from the enthusiastic acceptance of untried duty found herself plunged in tumultuous preoccupation with her personal lot.
But when the Pope finally refused Henry's demand for the divorce from Katharine of Spain, which would make possible a marriage with Anne Boleyn, Henry angrily threw off the papal authority and declared himself the Supreme Head of the Church in England, thus establishing the separate English (Anglican, Episcopal) church.
When that portentous system of abuses, the Papal dominion, was overturned, a great variety of religious sects arose in its stead in the several countries, which for many centuries before had been screwed beneath its subjection.