papalist

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papalist

(ˈpeɪpəlɪst)
n
(Roman Catholic Church) a follower of the Pope or papacy
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But with Dante and other imperialists, the Donation of Constantine and the idea of the transfer of empire from the Romans to the Germans, forced both imperialists and papalists to connect emperor and pontiff to ancient Rome.
In the push and pull of the council's deliberations, neither ardent papalists nor reform-minded "conciliarists" got everything they wanted, but a decision was made early on that proved beneficial for the life of believers.
The papalists also believed that since the pope was infallible when he pronounced definitive judgments on matters of faith and morals, the irreformability of his teaching did not depend on the consensus of the bishops.
At Vatican I, in a radical breach with tradition, the papalists handed over all power to the pope by conflating the three magisteria of bishops, theologians, and the sensus fidelium into one: the pope.
Opponents of papal power would have been anxious to place the cardinals on an equal footing with the pope, whereas papalists were anxious to exalt the pope as high as possible.
In response to that belief the Councils of Pisa (1409) and Constanee (1414-18) assembled to put an end to the schism, the conciliarists at the Council of Basel (1431-49) defied unsuccessfully the authority of a pope the validity of whose title was not in question, and the cardinals of the opposition convoked (May, 1511) the dissident and abortive assembly derided by the papalists of the day as the conciliabulum of Pisa.
Peter Courtenay, Henry's first keeper of the privy seal, had studied at Padua when one of the stars of the faculty was Antonio de' Roselli, one of the highest exponents of princely power in Europe in the era when papalists and monarchists closed ranks against conciliarists and other subversives.
When lay and clerical interests clash, it is the clergy who should define the boundaries between the two jurisdictions, a view shared by other extreme papalists such as James of Viterbo and Augustinus Triumphus.
Though past councils had aimed at "moral unanimity," it was the papalists who said that was not needed at Vatican I.
Henry filled this out in the Six Articles of 1539, which he intended as a definitive statement of faith (neither Papalists nor Protestants liked it, and called it 'the whip with six strings'), which declared him to be Head of 'this whole Church and Congregation of England'.
This was despite the recognition by such leading papalists as Bellarmine and Ballerini that papal infallibility was not a dogma of faith.
Thus] the papalist axiom that the divine law can be kept and observed fully and perfectly by the regenerate in this life.