papaya


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Related to papaya: papaya tree, passion fruit

pa·pa·ya

 (pə-pä′yə)
n.
1. An evergreen tropical American tree (Carica papaya) with a crown of large lobed leaves, widely cultivated for its large yellow edible fruit.
2. The fruit of this tree, having soft pink to orange flesh and numerous small black seeds. In both senses also called pawpaw.

[Spanish papaya, of Arawakan origin.]

papaya

(pəˈpaɪə)
n
1. (Plants) a Caribbean evergreen tree, Carica papaya, with a crown of large dissected leaves and large green hanging fruit: family Caricaceae
2. (Cookery) the fruit of this tree, having a yellow or reddish orange sweet edible pulp and small black seeds
Also called: papaw or pawpaw
[C15 papaye, from Spanish papaya, from an American Indian language; compare Carib ababai]
paˈpayan adj

pa•pa•ya

(pəˈpɑ yə)

n., pl. -yas.
1. a small tropical American tree, Carica papaya, resembling a palm with broad leaves at the top, bearing a yellow melonlike fruit.
2. the fruit itself.
[1760–70; < Sp < Carib (Hispaniola)]
pa•pa′yan, adj.

papaya


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(pawpaw) A Caribbean fruit with sweet yellow flesh and small black seeds.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.papaya - tropical American shrub or small tree having huge deeply palmately cleft leaves and large oblong yellow fruitpapaya - tropical American shrub or small tree having huge deeply palmately cleft leaves and large oblong yellow fruit
papaya - large oval melon-like tropical fruit with yellowish flesh
Carica, genus Carica - type genus of the Caricaceae; tropical American trees: papayas
fruit tree - tree bearing edible fruit
2.papaya - large oval melon-like tropical fruit with yellowish flesh
edible fruit - edible reproductive body of a seed plant especially one having sweet flesh
Carica papaya, melon tree, papaia, papaya, papaya tree, pawpaw - tropical American shrub or small tree having huge deeply palmately cleft leaves and large oblong yellow fruit
Translations
شَجَرة البابايا
papája
papaja
papaya
pepaya
melónutré; papaya
papajapapajinis melionmedis
papaija
papaja
papaya
đu đủ

papaya

[pəˈpaɪə] N (= fruit) → papaya f; (= tree) → árbol m de papaya

papaya

[pəˈpaɪə] n (= pawpaw) → papaye f

papaya

nPapayabaum f; (= fruit)Papaya f

papaya

[pəˈpaɪə] npapaia

papaya

(pəˈpaiə) noun
a tropical tree or its fruit.
References in periodicals archive ?
freshly ground pepper PAPAYA SALAD 4 firm-ripe Hawaiian papayas or 1 large firm-ripe Mexican papaya 2 cups loosely packed basil leaves 1/2 sweet or red onion, thinly sliced 8 to 10 small red radishes or 3 to 4 watermelon radishes, very thinly sliced 6 large oranges, peeled and sectioned 1 3/4 cups salted toasted macadamia nuts, chopped Edible flowers, such as borage or sweet pea, for garnish
Signed to Emvels Records, Papaya speaks with SEGUN ADEBAYO about his life, music and family.
One such treasure is the Thai papaya salad which is amongst Thai cuisines best exports.
Deliciously sweet with musky undertones and a soft, butter-like consistency, it is no wonder the papaya was reputably called the 'fruit of the angels' by explorer Christopher Columbus.
com)-- The Account Transfer Service for moving War Rock accounts from Nexon servers to their new home at Papaya Play is available now.
The main objective of the current study is to evaluate the medicinal role of Papaya seeds on thrombocyte count and hepatic parameter on healthy rabbits.
Papaya is used throughout the tropics as a primary health source; in Indonesia it is a cure for rheumatism; in Africa a treatment for syphilis, yellow fever and dysentery; the people of the Caribbean use the latex from the bark to treat ringworm, psoriasis and topical cancers.
5, 8) Citric acid content is widely available in the pineapple and papaya with citric acid content of 346 mg pineapple and papaya is 335 mg.
Awan met ti naidumduma a birbirukek idi agin-inawak malaksid iti prutas a papaya ken pinya (I did not crave for food during my pregnancy except for papaya and pineapple),' she said.
A severe invasion of the papaya mealybug (Paracoccus marginatus) nearly wiped out papaya orchards in Pakistan before the largely farmed country decided to replace conventional chemical pesticides that were ineffective with natural predators that proved to be successful.