papillomavirus

(redirected from Papillomaviruses)
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pap·il·lo·ma·vi·rus

 (păp′ĭ-lō′mə-vī′rəs)
n.
Any of a group of DNA viruses of the family Papillomavirus that can cause warts and certain types of cancer in mammals.

papillomavirus

(ˌpæpɪˈləʊməˌvaɪərəs)
n
(Biology) any of numerous viruses that cause the formation of papillomas

pap•il•lo•ma•vi•rus

(ˌpæp əˈloʊ məˌvaɪ rəs)

n., pl. -rus•es.
a type of papovavirus, containing circular DNA, that causes papillomas, including genital warts.
[1980–85]
Translations

papillomavirus

n virus m del papiloma papilomavirus m; human — (HPV) virus m del papiloma humano (VPH), papilomavirus humano (PVH)
References in periodicals archive ?
Oncogenic human papillomaviruses are rarely associated with squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder: evaluation by differential polymerase chain reaction.
Type distribution, viral load and integration status of high-risk human papillomaviruses in pre-stages of cervical cancer (CIN).
The use of nested Ipolymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment ength polymorphism for the detection and typing of mucosal human papillomaviruses in samples containing low copy numbers of viral DNA.
Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are a large family of small, genetically diverse DNA viruses that can cause benign and malignant proliferations of the skin and mucosal epithelia (1, 2).
From the Latin papillo- ("nipple") + oma ("tumor"), papillomaviruses are nonenveloped DNA viruses that induce exophytic lesions of the skin and mucous membranes.
Human papillomaviruses : basic mechanisms of pathogenesis and oncogenicity.
Genotype distribution of human papillomaviruses in Japanese women with abnormal cervical cytology.
High prevalence of human papillomaviruses in the normal oral cavity of adults.
Healthy skin of many animal species harbors papillomaviruses which are closely related to their human counterparts.
We present here a multiplex polymerase chain reaction, which detects and distinguishes infection by 2 such agents, avipoxviruses and papillomaviruses, in avian hosts.
1 he role of UV light in feline SCC remains unclear, and any causal relationship between SCCs and papillomaviruses in cats cannot be concluded.
Human Papillomaviruses (HPVs) are the cause of over 90% of cervical cancer cases.