parable


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par·a·ble

 (păr′ə-bəl)
n.
A simple story illustrating a moral or religious lesson.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Late Latin parabola, from Greek parabolē, from paraballein, to compare : para-, beside; see para-1 + ballein, to throw; see gwelə- in Indo-European roots.]

parable

(ˈpærəbəl)
n
1. a short story that uses familiar events to illustrate a religious or ethical point
2. (Bible) any of the stories of this kind told by Jesus Christ
[C14: from Old French parabole, from Latin parabola comparison, from Greek parabolē analogy, from paraballein to throw alongside, from para-1 + ballein to throw]
parabolist n

par•a•ble

(ˈpær ə bəl)

n.
1. a short allegorical story designed to illustrate or teach some truth, religious principle, or moral lesson.
2. a statement or comment that conveys a meaning indirectly by the use of comparison, analogy, or the like.
[1275–1325; Middle English parabil < Late Latin parabola comparison, parable, word < Greek parabolḗ comparison]

parable

A story told by Jesus to convey his religious message.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.parable - a short moral story (often with animal characters)parable - a short moral story (often with animal characters)
story - a piece of fiction that narrates a chain of related events; "he writes stories for the magazines"
Aesop's fables - a collection of fables believed to have been written by the Greek storyteller Aesop
2.parable - (New Testament) any of the stories told by Jesus to convey his religious message; "the parable of the prodigal son"
story - a piece of fiction that narrates a chain of related events; "he writes stories for the magazines"
New Testament - the collection of books of the Gospels, Acts of the Apostles, the Pauline and other epistles, and Revelation; composed soon after Christ's death; the second half of the Christian Bible

parable

noun lesson, story, fable, allegory, moral tale, exemplum the parable of the Good Samaritan
Related words
adjectives parabolic, parabolical
Translations
podobenství
parabel
példázat
dæmisaga
didaktinė alegorijaparabolė
alegorijalīdzība
parabola
podobenstvo
dinî öykükıssa

parable

[ˈpærəbl] Nparábola f

parable

[ˈpærəbəl] n (= moral story) → parabole f

parable

nParabel f, → Gleichnis nt

parable

[ˈpærəbl] nparabola (Rel)

parable

(ˈpӕrəbl) noun
a story (especially in the Bible) which is intended to teach a lesson. Jesus told parables.
References in classic literature ?
But here -- if we suppose this interview betwixt Mistress Hibbins and Hester Prynne to be authentic, and not a parable -- was already an illustration of the young minister's argument against sundering the relation of a fallen mother to the offspring of her frailty.
That's a parable of the general situation in England.
These fellows demonstrate a hidden meaning in "The Antediluvians," a parable in Powhatan," new views in "Cock Robin," and transcendentalism in "Hop O' My Thumb.
The parable of Pythagoras is dark, but true; Cor ne edito; Eat not the heart.
There was nothing more at Jerusalem to be seen, except the traditional houses of Dives and Lazarus of the parable, the Tombs of the Kings, and those of the Judges; the spot where they stoned one of the disciples to death, and beheaded another; the room and the table made celebrated by the Last Supper; the fig-tree that Jesus withered; a number of historical places about Gethsemane and the Mount of Olives, and fifteen or twenty others in different portions of the city itself.
He thought of Cronshaw's parable of the Persian carpet.
He remembered the parable of the unjust judge, and though he had previously felt sure that he ought to refuse, he now began to hesitate and, having hesitated, took to prayer and prayed until a decision formed itself in his soul.
Your readers will possibly comprehend that the Atlantic, in this parable, stands for the mighty ocean of ether through which we drift and that the bunch of corks represents the little and obscure planetary system to which we belong.
men, and it was not for nothing that he read us this parable.
And this use of examples or images, though truly Socratic in origin, is enlarged by the genius of Plato into the form of an allegory or parable, which embodies in the concrete what has been already described, or is about to be described, in the abstract.
Time and space are but physiological colors which the eye makes, but the soul is light: where it is, is day; where it was, is night; and history is an impertinence and an injury if it be any thing more than a cheerful apologue or parable of my being and becoming.
Hump, do you know the parable of the sower who went forth to sow?