paradigmatic


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par·a·dig·mat·ic

 (păr′ə-dĭg-măt′ĭk)
adj.
1. Of or relating to a paradigm.
2. Linguistics Of or relating to the set of substitutional or oppositional relationships a linguistic unit has with other units, such as the relationship between (n) in not and other sounds that could be substituted for it in the same context, like (t) and (p). Together with the set of syntagmatic relations, paradigmatic relations describe the identity of a linguistic unit in a given language.

[French paradigmatique, from Greek paradeigmatikos, serving as a model, from paradeigma, paradeigmat-, example; see paradigm.]

par•a•dig•mat•ic

(ˌpær ə dɪgˈmæt ɪk)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to a paradigm.
2. pertaining to or being a relationship among linguistic elements that can substitute for each other in a given context, as the relationship of sun in The sun is shining to other nouns that could substitute for it, as star or light. Compare syntagmatic.
[1655–65; < Greek paradeigmatikós=paradeigmat-, s. of parádeigma paradigm + -ikos -ic]
par`a•dig•mat′i•cal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.paradigmatic - of or relating to a grammatical paradigm; "paradigmatic inflection"
2.paradigmatic - of or relating to a typical example; "paradigmatic learning"
3.paradigmatic - related as members of a substitution class; "paradigmatic word associations"
syntagmatic - related as members of a syntagma; "syntagmatic word associations"

paradigmatic

adjective
Translations

paradigmatic

[ˌpærədɪgˈmætɪk] ADJparadigmático

paradigmatic

paradigmatic

[ˌpærədɪgˈmætɪk] adjparadigmatico/a
References in periodicals archive ?
He covers Maxwell equations, Green functions of electrostatics and electrodynamics, paradigmatic calculations in electrostatics and electrodynamics, electrodynamics in media, waveguides and cavities, and advanced topics.
The University of Ireland in Galway professor said there is still a lack of consent when it comes to having sex with a child robot, albeit paradigmatic.
Distributed Morphology (hereafter DM, Halle & Marantz 1993, Halle 1997, Harley and Noyer 1999) however, denies the possibility of paradigmatic influence.
Ben Cohen profiled Hufnagel in 2013 when the Cornell grad was on Harvard's coaching staff, calling the 32-year-old "the paradigmatic nice Jewish boy"and one hell of a recruiter.
Abaidoo and Dickinson (2002) noted that the adoption of sustainable agriculture reflects not only changes in production practices, but also represents a shift in paradigmatic preferences, environmental beliefs, attitudes, and values.
Complutense de Madrid, Spain) contribute to recent descriptive accounts of the clause grammars of different languages from the systemic functional perspective, offer a unique perspective on Spanish based on the systemic functional conception of grammar as a resource for making and expressing meanings that are instantiated in different text types, and present a contrastive account with selected regions of the English grammar in order to highlight the main differences at both the paradigmatic and the syntagmatic levels.
Secondly, the paper tries to scaffold teachers' argumentation practices modeling them with paradigmatic exemplars (which the author calls "epitomes").
Technology, I propose, disrupts linearity by imposing what Saussure called the paradigmatic axis of language--the metaphorically vertical dimension from which items are selected.
The "interaction" of Robert Musil and Kai Loser is paradigmatic for this process.
We present one woman's story as a paradigmatic healing process that illustrates an attempted suicide, her near-death experience (NDE), and subsequent recovery from bulimia nervosa.