parador

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par·a·dor

 (păr′ə-dôr′, pä′rä-thôr′, -dôr′)
n. pl. par·a·dors or par·a·dor·es (-thō′rĕs, -dō′-)
A country hotel owned by the government of Spain.

[Spanish, from parar, to stop, from Latin parāre, to prepare; see parade.]

parador

(ˈpærədɔː; Spanish ˈparaðor)
n, pl -dors or -dores
a state-run hotel in Spain
[Spanish]

pa•ra•dor

(ˈpær əˌdɔr)

n.
a government-sponsored inn, esp. in Spain.
[1835–45; < Sp: wayside inn, hostelry]
References in periodicals archive ?
Christiane Barker, Brittany Ferries' holidays general manager which runs ferries to Spain, says: "In an age when so many hotels are indistinguishable, I love paradors because each one is unique.
The Club have been quoted prices in the region of PS700 per person for ferry and accommodation in twin rooms in Paradors.
The only part of our pre-arranged itinerary was staying in four paradors, the network of hotels across the country that range from remarkable old buildings to ultra modern hotels.
There are 90 Paradors in Spain, and 40 Pousadas in Portugal ( a portfolio which includes castles, monasteries, convents and other historic buildings restored and converted into hotels.
Diamond began inspecting 130 properties, including local paradors that are neither endorsed by the Tourism Co.
In all three cities, we stayed in paradors - a state-run chain of hotels, mostly in huge, historic buildings which often had no other obvious use.
Brittany Ferries also offers packages to Santander and pre- booked deals covering 72 Spanish paradors.
The significant increase also applies to registrations in Puerto Rico's hotels and paradors island-wide, which registered a 12.
Along the way we would stay in the historical Paradors unique to Spain.
There are 90 paradors in Spain, and 40 pousadas in Portugal - a portfolio which includes castles, monasteries, convents and other historic buildings restored and converted into hotels to offer a 'real' taste of each country.
For years, the luxury way to explore inland Spain was via the chain of state-owned paradors.