paralipsis

(redirected from paraleipses)

par·a·lip·sis

 (păr′ə-lĭp′sĭs) or par·a·leip·sis (-līp′-) or par·a·lep·sis (-lĕp′-)
n. pl. par·a·lip·ses (-sēz) or par·a·leip·ses or par·a·lep·ses

[Late Latin paralīpsis, from Greek paraleipsis, omission, apophasis, from paraleipein, to leave to the side, omit : para-, para- + leipein, to leave; see leikw in Indo-European roots.]

paralipsis

(ˌpærəˈlɪpsɪs) or

paraleipsis

n, pl -ses (-siːz)
(Rhetoric) a rhetorical device in which an idea is emphasized by the pretence that it is too obvious to discuss, as in there are many drawbacks to your plan, not to mention the cost
[C16: via Late Latin from Greek: neglect, from paraleipein to leave aside, from para-1 + leipein to leave]

paralipsis

The emphasizing of something by pretending that it does not have to be mentioned.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.paralipsis - suggesting by deliberately concise treatment that much of significance is omitted
rhetorical device - a use of language that creates a literary effect (but often without regard for literal significance)