paralipsis


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Related to paralipsis: paraleipsis, paralepsis, apophasis, Praeteritio, Proslepsis

paralipsis

(ˌpærəˈlɪpsɪs) or

paraleipsis

n, pl -ses (-siːz)
(Rhetoric) a rhetorical device in which an idea is emphasized by the pretence that it is too obvious to discuss, as in there are many drawbacks to your plan, not to mention the cost
[C16: via Late Latin from Greek: neglect, from paraleipein to leave aside, from para-1 + leipein to leave]

paralipsis

The emphasizing of something by pretending that it does not have to be mentioned.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.paralipsis - suggesting by deliberately concise treatment that much of significance is omitted
rhetorical device - a use of language that creates a literary effect (but often without regard for literal significance)
References in periodicals archive ?
The contextual gaps can be paralepsis (information in excess of what is called for by the logic of the type selected), analepses (to provide necessary information about a character or event, characteristically to fill in gaps (5)) or paralipsis (6) (the holding back of information that would be logically produced under the type of focalization selected).
This status is someone who informs the process of concealment and revelation in simultaneous inexplicit or withheld information flow as paralepsis (giving of more information than is the norm given the degree of constraint according to focalization or perspective from which story told), or paralipsis (false omission) or analepses (33) (fill in gaps to provide necessary info about a character or event).
But even these lead frequently to listings of what ancient authority has to say about other urns--Frye's "piling up of enormous erudition"--and this leads to long discussions of how the contents of those lists--the contents just described and discussed--will not be discussed, in a kind of extended paralipsis or feigned omission.
442), describing the paralipsis as articulating a sense of horror, "as if the potential matricide is the point at which we reach the genuinely unspeakable" (ibid.
To achieve this effect, Joyce frequently writes in paralipsis, to adopt the term offered by Gerald Prince and Gerard Genette.
25) Yet, provided that we stick to Genette's terminology, what we have here comes closer to a paralipsis than to an ellipsis: the intradiegetic narrator (consciously) neglects to mention that he is identical with the commander in his tale, simply sidestepping a very important element without breaking the narrative continuity--the result is similar to a heterodiegetic autobiography.
Lipman, practitioner par-excellence of the argument ad hominem and paralipsis in the service of reactionary criticism, never fails to elicit a reaction from his readers; one might best consider Lipman the music world's equivalent of Rush Limbaugh.
8) In section 4, however, we comment on Genette's notions of paralipsis and paralepsis which appear to be violations of (R1) and (R4).
The novel has been called too neat, "a touch self-satisfied, rather too much conscious of its high moral ground" (Anderson 39), and its narrator, in her recurring use of paralipsis, too "skilled" a "rhetorician and .
4) On the illusionistic or mimetic effects of supposedly transgressive techniques like paralipsis, paralepsis, metanarration and metalepsis see also Phelan (chs.
In other words, even as paralipsis signifies an unreliability of facts at both story and discourse levels, it indicates a reliability about norms.
Although this omission constitutes a true paralipsis as far as Mr.