parallactic


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par·al·lax

 (păr′ə-lăks′)
n.
A change in the apparent position of an object relative to more distant objects, caused by a change in the observer's line of sight toward the object.

[French parallaxe, from Greek parallaxis, from parallassein, to change : para-, among; see para-1 + allassein, to exchange (from allos, other; see al- in Indo-European roots).]

par′al·lac′tic (-lăk′tĭk) adj.
References in periodicals archive ?
The painted colors, applied without regard for parity with the underlying form, show structure and surface to be engaged in a parallactic play, revealing visual satisfaction to be independent of compositional coherence.
She is speaking to Eliot's work, arguing with it, countering his opinions with her own observations, which stand at parallactic odds with his.
Interior spaces were multiplied by mirrors or windows or angles, arranged so that the occupant of a room would see "not enclosing walls, but a series of open arcades through which architectural spaces extended in an infinite parallactic sequence beyond the confines of the room" (Collins 27).
Zevit, The Religions of Ancient Israel: A Synthesis of Parallactic Approaches (New York: Continuum, 2001), 664.
Postmodern Historiography: Politics and Parallactic Method in Thomas Pynchon's Mason & Dixon.
Wakefield can be appreciated as coarticulator of a ventriloquistic logos and choreographer of a telescopic parallactic vision.
Presenting the illusion of historical recovery, it is parallactic, even allegorical.
For a discussion of Digges's Alce, see Robert Goulding, "Wings (or Stairs) to the Heavens: The Parallactic Treatises of John Dee and Thomas Digges", in John Dee: Interdisciplinary Studies in English Renaissance Thought, ed.
The distances were measured with a tape or using parallactic distance measurement method and the angles were measured with a one-second theodolite (Zeiss Theo 010, Wild T 2m, etc.
5) Lehmann is careful to specify that his is not intended to be "eine durchgefuhrte Lekture des Textes" but rather merely "die Exposition eines fur Kafkas Schreiben entscheidenden Motivs," but this does not prevent him from pointing out, in a characteristically parallactic gesture, "eine Reihe von Wortspielen und Anspielungen," which one could pursue if one were so inclined.
The "umbilical cord" between these thrusts is the parallactic dynamic of jouissance: "that which we can never reach, attain, and that which we can never get rid of (Zizek, Parallax 115).
Advertising slogans that promote non-alcoholic beer and fatless food are, for Vighi as well as for Zizek, so many indications of how the parallactic emptiness of the commodity reduces enjoyment to an anxiety-provoking displacement without which the consumer would be deprived of his or her minimal being (23-4).