parallel importing


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parallel importing

n
(Commerce) the importing of certain goods, esp pharmaceutical drugs, by dealers who undersell local manufacturers
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Parallel importing, the act of importing non-counterfeit products from other countries in which the product is sold more cheaply, has the potential to significantly benefit Australian consumers.
Parallel importing has attracted increasing interest in the international practice, and concern to manufacturers and retailers since the mid-1980s (Mitchell 1998; Eagle et al.
Parallel importing of medicines to exploit national price differentials and free movement of goods between the various EU member states has provoked strong controversy in the pharmaceutical industry, blaming the 70 parallel market businesses for loss in earnings of 1.
Perhaps the bigger problem to be tackled, though, is the illegal practice of parallel importing.
The parallel importing was ruled illegal because the company did not have Cussons' consent to source the product from outside the EU.
Parallel importing describes a practice whereby a country imports goods for resale without authorization from the original seller.
Apparently paragraph (b) refers primarily to parallel importing of medicines made by the patent holder and sold by the patent holder at discount elsewhere in the world.
194) First, the patentee may prevent the, buyer from parallel importing by contract, wherein the buyer may not resell the goods in Japan.
Parallel importing would allow South Africa to import desperately needed medicines from countries where they were available for less--sometimes far less--than a drug company would charge in South Africa.
That law authorized Pretoria to use two mechanisms to get AIDS drugs to those who so desperately need them: parallel importing (enabling importers to buy the drugs from the cheapest source available worldwide) and compulsory licensing (enabling local companies to make the drugs at a fraction of their cost to US consumers), both legal under the World Trade Organization's agreements on intellectual property.
With TRIPS greatly constraining countries' intellectual property policy options to lower drug prices, consumer and public health advocates, as well as a few developing country governments, began to turn their attention to two TRIPS-legal policy tools: compulsory licensing and parallel importing.
In response, the South African government passed a law in 1997, the Medicines and Related Substances Act, allowing compulsory licensing and parallel importing of vital drugs like these.

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