parametrically


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pa·ram·e·ter

 (pə-răm′ĭ-tər)
n.
1. Mathematics
a. A constant in an equation that varies in other equations of the same general form, especially such a constant in the equation of a curve or surface that can be varied to represent a family of curves or surfaces.
b. One of a set of independent variables that express the coordinates of a point.
2.
a. One of a set of measurable factors, such as temperature and pressure, that define a system and determine its behavior and are varied in an experiment.
b. Usage Problem A factor that restricts what is possible or what results: "all the parameters of shelter—where people will live, what mode of housing they will choose, and how they will pay for it" (New York).
c. A factor that determines a range of variations; a boundary: an experimental school that keeps expanding the parameters of its curriculum.
3. Statistics A quantity, such as a mean, that is calculated from data and describes a population.
4. Usage Problem A distinguishing characteristic or feature.

[New Latin parametrum, a line through the focus and parallel to the directrix of a conic : Greek para-, beside; see para-1 + Greek metron, measure; see -meter.]

par′a·met′ric (păr′ə-mĕt′rĭk), par′a·met′ri·cal adj.
par′a·met′ri·cal·ly adv.
Usage Note: The term parameter, which originates in mathematics, has a number of specific meanings in fields such as astronomy, electricity, crystallography, and statistics. Perhaps because of its ring of technical authority, people have applied parameter more generally in recent years to refer to any factor that determines a range of variations and especially to a factor that restricts what results from a process or policy. In this use, the word parameter is used to mean "the particular value of a parameter," and comes close to meaning "a set limit or boundary." For example, a budget can be thought of as a set of parameters that determine a range of activity, much like a set of mathematical parameters that establish the range of effects, or limits, of other variables. The sentence A budget is a framework that defines the financial parameters within which an organization operates was considered acceptable by 81 percent of the Usage Panel in our 2004 survey. Parameter is sometimes used incorrectly when it does not denote a range of variation, as if it were a technical-sounding synonym for characteristic. In 1988, 88 percent of the Usage Panel rejected the sentence The Judeo-Christian ethic is one of the important parameters of Western culture. In 2004, 77 percent rejected this same sentence, suggesting that familiarity has not bred tolerance of this usage.

parametrically

(ˌpærəˈmɛtrɪklɪ)
adv
in terms of a parameter
References in periodicals archive ?
Visionary architects, such as Zaha Hadid and Patrick Schumacher have foreseen a future with parametrically developed forms.
One group models the probability distribution of the image entities directly either parametrically or non parametrically, without using graphical models (Tu, Narr, Dollar, Dinov, Thompson, and Toga, 2008), (Tu, Chen, Yuille, and Zhu, 2003).
In this way, we can combine local contextual differences within an overall identity and parametrically adapt physical factors such as wayfinding, daylight penetration, passenger flows, constructive elements etc.
The data were distributed parametrically according to the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test.
In this research, configurability was defined as the ability to parametrically modify the design of the model with only limited number of variable parameters to maintain similar appearance.
k] had been generalized parametrically and their bounds had been studied in terms of generalized measures of entropies.
The configuration of both the building form and the skin panel parametrically respond to environment and programme alike.
b] values were parametrically analyzed as shown in Figure 3.