parasite


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Related to parasite: parasite infection

par·a·site

 (păr′ə-sīt′)
n.
1. Biology An organism that lives and feeds on or in an organism of a different species and causes harm to its host.
2.
a. One who habitually takes advantage of the generosity of others without making any useful return.
b. One who lives off and flatters the rich; a sycophant.
3. A professional dinner guest, especially in ancient Greece.

[Latin parasītus, a person who lives by amusing the rich, from Greek parasītos, person who eats at someone else's table, parasite : para-, beside; see para-1 + sītos, grain, food.]

parasite

(ˈpærəˌsaɪt)
n
1. (Biology) an animal or plant that lives in or on another (the host) from which it obtains nourishment. The host does not benefit from the association and is often harmed by it
2. a person who habitually lives at the expense of others; sponger
3. (formerly) a sycophant
[C16: via Latin from Greek parasitos one who lives at another's expense, from para-1 + sitos grain]
parasitic, ˌparaˈsitical adj
ˌparaˈsitically adv

par•a•site

(ˈpær əˌsaɪt)

n.
1. an organism that lives on or within a plant or animal of another species, from which it obtains nutrients (opposed to host).
2. a person who receives support or advantage from another without giving any useful or proper return, as one who lives on the hospitality of others.
3. (esp. in ancient Greece) a person receiving free meals in return for amusing conversation or flattery.
[1530–40; < Latin parasītus < Greek parásītos one who eats at another's table =para- para-1 + sîtos grain, food]

par·a·site

(păr′ə-sīt′)
An organism that lives in or on a different kind of organism (called the host) from which it gets some or all of its nourishment. Parasites are generally harmful to their hosts, and in some cases they may even destroy the other organism, although more often the damage they do is minor. Lice and tapeworms are parasites of humans.

parasite


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An organism living on or in, and feeding on, another organism.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.parasite - an animal or plant that lives in or on a host (another animal or plant)parasite - an animal or plant that lives in or on a host (another animal or plant); it obtains nourishment from the host without benefiting or killing the host
organism, being - a living thing that has (or can develop) the ability to act or function independently
plant life, flora, plant - (botany) a living organism lacking the power of locomotion
endoparasite, endozoan, entoparasite, entozoan, entozoon - any of various parasites that live in the internal organs of animals (especially intestinal worms)
ectoparasite, ectozoan, ectozoon, epizoan, epizoon - any external parasitic organism (as fleas)
parasitic plant - plant living on another plant and obtaining organic nutriment from it
host - an animal or plant that nourishes and supports a parasite; it does not benefit and is often harmed by the association
2.parasite - a follower who hangs around a host (without benefit to the host) in hope of gain or advantage
follower - a person who accepts the leadership of another

parasite

noun sponger (informal), sponge (informal), drone (Brit.), leech, hanger-on, scrounger (informal), bloodsucker (informal), cadger parasites living off the state

parasite

noun
One who depends on another for support without reciprocating:
Slang: freeloader.
Translations
طُفَيْلِي
parazitcizopasník
parasit
nametnikparazit
parazitaélősködő
afætasníkillsníkjudýrsníkjudÿr
parazitasparazitinis
parazīts
parazitparazită
parazit
parasit

parasite

[ˈpærəsaɪt] N (lit, fig) → parásito/a m/f (on de)

parasite

[ˈpærəsaɪt] n
(= animal, plant) → parasite m
(fig)parasite m

parasite

n (lit)Parasit m, → Schmarotzer m; (fig)Schmarotzer(in) m(f)

parasite

[ˈpærəˌsaɪt] nparassita m

parasite

(ˈpӕrəsait) noun
an animal or plant that lives on another animal or plant without giving anything in return. Fleas are parasites; He is a parasite on society.
ˌparaˈsitic adjective

par·a·site

n. parásito, organismo que vive a expensas de otro.

parasite

n parásito
References in classic literature ?
Their numbers were small; their stations in life obscure; the object of their enterprise unostentatious; the theatre of their exploits remote; how could they possibly be favorites of worldly Fame--that common crier, whose existence is only known by the assemblage of multitudes; that pander of wealth and greatness, so eager to haunt the palaces of fortune, and so fastidious to the houseless dignity of virtue; that parasite of pride, ever scornful to meekness, and ever obsequious to insolent power; that heedless trumpeter, whose ears are deaf to modest merit, and whose eyes are blind to bloodless, distant excellence?
Being considered a man of leisure, du Bousquier led the same parasite life as the chevalier; and he who does not spend his income is always rich.
Here he was at least, and had been any time these past ten years, a sort of dismal parasite upon the foreigner in Paris.
His hands and feet would be freezing, and his breath coming with difficulty; until, look you, he would begin to cough, and disease, like an unclean parasite, would worm its way into his breast until death itself had overtaken him-- overtaken him in some foetid corner whence there was no chance of escape.
The Oorya, not unanxious to play off one parasite against the other, slunk away towards the dovecote
There was some thick, bush-like clump which seemed to be a parasite upon a branch up which I was swarming.
The house was overrun with ivy, its chimney being enlarged by the boughs of the parasite to the aspect of a ruined tower.
For smoke, which is the London ivy, had so wreathed itself round Peffer's name and clung to his dwelling-place that the affectionate parasite quite overpowered the parent tree.
Love was like a parasite in his heart, nourishing a hateful existence on his life's blood; it absorbed his existence so intensely that he could take pleasure in nothing else.
After all, the idea was quite logical; a parasite and landowner naturally supposed that intelligence was a marketable commodity like everything else, and that in Switzerland especially it could be bought for money.
Perhaps, in the far future, when generations of men had struggled and failed as he must now struggle and fail, woman would be, indeed, what she now made a pretence of being--the friend and companion-- not the enemy and parasite of man.
was undoubtedly the most artful and uncompromising flatterer that ever smoothed out all the natural characteristic blemishes from a sitter's face; but even that accomplished parasite would have found Mr.