parasite

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Related to Parasites: Protozoa, Parasitic diseases

par·a·site

 (păr′ə-sīt′)
n.
1. Biology An organism that lives and feeds on or in an organism of a different species and causes harm to its host.
2.
a. One who habitually takes advantage of the generosity of others without making any useful return.
b. One who lives off and flatters the rich; a sycophant.
3. A professional dinner guest, especially in ancient Greece.

[Latin parasītus, a person who lives by amusing the rich, from Greek parasītos, person who eats at someone else's table, parasite : para-, beside; see para-1 + sītos, grain, food.]

parasite

(ˈpærəˌsaɪt)
n
1. (Biology) an animal or plant that lives in or on another (the host) from which it obtains nourishment. The host does not benefit from the association and is often harmed by it
2. a person who habitually lives at the expense of others; sponger
3. (formerly) a sycophant
[C16: via Latin from Greek parasitos one who lives at another's expense, from para-1 + sitos grain]
parasitic, ˌparaˈsitical adj
ˌparaˈsitically adv

par•a•site

(ˈpær əˌsaɪt)

n.
1. an organism that lives on or within a plant or animal of another species, from which it obtains nutrients (opposed to host).
2. a person who receives support or advantage from another without giving any useful or proper return, as one who lives on the hospitality of others.
3. (esp. in ancient Greece) a person receiving free meals in return for amusing conversation or flattery.
[1530–40; < Latin parasītus < Greek parásītos one who eats at another's table =para- para-1 + sîtos grain, food]

par·a·site

(păr′ə-sīt′)
An organism that lives in or on a different kind of organism (called the host) from which it gets some or all of its nourishment. Parasites are generally harmful to their hosts, and in some cases they may even destroy the other organism, although more often the damage they do is minor. Lice and tapeworms are parasites of humans.

parasite


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An organism living on or in, and feeding on, another organism.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.parasite - an animal or plant that lives in or on a host (another animal or plant)parasite - an animal or plant that lives in or on a host (another animal or plant); it obtains nourishment from the host without benefiting or killing the host
organism, being - a living thing that has (or can develop) the ability to act or function independently
plant life, flora, plant - (botany) a living organism lacking the power of locomotion
endoparasite, endozoan, entoparasite, entozoan, entozoon - any of various parasites that live in the internal organs of animals (especially intestinal worms)
ectoparasite, ectozoan, ectozoon, epizoan, epizoon - any external parasitic organism (as fleas)
parasitic plant - plant living on another plant and obtaining organic nutriment from it
host - an animal or plant that nourishes and supports a parasite; it does not benefit and is often harmed by the association
2.parasite - a follower who hangs around a host (without benefit to the host) in hope of gain or advantage
follower - a person who accepts the leadership of another

parasite

noun sponger (informal), sponge (informal), drone (Brit.), leech, hanger-on, scrounger (informal), bloodsucker (informal), cadger parasites living off the state

parasite

noun
One who depends on another for support without reciprocating:
Slang: freeloader.
Translations
طُفَيْلِي
parazitcizopasník
parasit
nametnikparazit
parazitaélősködő
afætasníkillsníkjudýrsníkjudÿr
parazitasparazitinis
parazīts
parazitparazită
parazit
parasit

parasite

[ˈpærəsaɪt] N (lit, fig) → parásito/a m/f (on de)

parasite

[ˈpærəsaɪt] n
(= animal, plant) → parasite m
(fig)parasite m

parasite

n (lit)Parasit m, → Schmarotzer m; (fig)Schmarotzer(in) m(f)

parasite

[ˈpærəˌsaɪt] nparassita m

parasite

(ˈpӕrəsait) noun
an animal or plant that lives on another animal or plant without giving anything in return. Fleas are parasites; He is a parasite on society.
ˌparaˈsitic adjective

par·a·site

n. parásito, organismo que vive a expensas de otro.

parasite

n parásito
References in classic literature ?
You have been brought up to it, you plod on like beasts of burden, thinking only of the day and its pain--yet is there a man among you who can believe that such a system will continue forever--is there a man here in this audience tonight so hardened and debased that he dare rise up before me and say that he believes it can continue forever; that the product of the labor of society, the means of existence of the human race, will always belong to idlers and parasites, to be spent for the gratification of vanity and lust--to be spent for any purpose whatever, to be at the disposal of any individual will whatever--that somehow, somewhere, the labor of humanity will not belong to humanity, to be used for the purposes of humanity, to be controlled by the will of humanity?
A lively quarrel ensued, Trefusis denouncing the folly of artists in fancying themselves a priestly caste when they were obviously only the parasites and favored slaves of the moneyed classes, and his friend (temporarily his enemy) sneering bitterly at levellers who were for levelling down instead of levelling up.
They know from experience that they sometimes err; and the wonder is that they so seldom err as they do, beset, as they continually are, by the wiles of parasites and sycophants, by the snares of the ambitious, the avaricious, the desperate, by the artifices of men who possess their confidence more than they deserve it, and of those who seek to possess rather than to deserve it.
If the stock had not been old and overcrowded, the Wax-moth would never have entered; but where bees are too thick on the comb there must be sickness or parasites.
Glorious men are the scorn of wise men, the admiration of fools, the idols of parasites, and the slaves of their own vaunts.
We nestle in nature, and draw our living as parasites from her roots and grains, and we receive glances from the heavenly bodies, which call us to solitude and foretell the remotest future.
He appears to have been one of those Russian parasites who lead an idle existence abroad, spending the summer at some spa, and the winter in Paris, to the greater profit of the organizers of public balls.
The country to-day looks to its army and its navy to save it from the humiliation these black-coated parasites have encouraged, and yet even now we haven't a free hand.
multitude of political parasites, logically active but fortuitously
A great king-post, half a hundred feet in length, seasoned by centuries of superstitious care, carven into dynasties of gods, each superimposed, each helmeted, each seated in the open mouth of a crocodile, was slung by ropes, twisted of climbing vegetable parasites, from the apex of a tripod of three great forest trunks, themselves carved into grinning and grotesque adumbrations of man's modern concepts of art and god.
Fentolin's parasites or bodyguards, or whatever you call them.
Having now arrived at the conclusion of his discourse, Sampson checked the current of his wrath, kissed his glove again, and smiled as only parasites and cowards can.