parent


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par·ent

 (pâr′ənt, păr′-)
n.
1.
a. A female person whose egg unites with a sperm or a male person whose sperm unites with an egg, resulting in the conception of a child or the birth of a child.
b. A female person who is pregnant with or gives birth to a child except when someone else has legal rights to the child.
c. A person who adopts a child.
d. A person who raises a child.
2. An ancestor; a progenitor.
3. An organism that produces or generates offspring.
4. A guardian; a protector.
5. A parent company.
6. A source or cause; an origin: Despair is the parent of rebellion.
v. par·ent·ed, par·ent·ing, par·ents
v.tr.
1. To act as a parent to; raise and nurture: "A genitor who does not parent the child is not its parent" (Ashley Montagu).
2. To cause to come into existence; originate.
v.intr.
To act as a parent.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin parēns, parent-, from past active participle of parere, to give birth; see perə- in Indo-European roots.]

par′ent·hood′ n.

parent

(ˈpɛərənt)
n
1. a father or mother
2. a person acting as a father or mother; guardian
3. (Anthropology & Ethnology) rare an ancestor
4. a source or cause
5. (Biology)
a. an organism or organization that has produced one or more organisms or organizations similar to itself
b. (as modifier): a parent organism.
6. (Chemistry) physics chem
a. a precursor, such as a nucleus or compound, of a derived entity
b. (as modifier): a parent nucleus; a parent ion.
7. (General Physics) physics chem
a. a precursor, such as a nucleus or compound, of a derived entity
b. (as modifier): a parent nucleus; a parent ion.
[C15: via Old French from Latin parens parent, from parere to bring forth]
ˈparenthood n

par•ent

(ˈpɛər ənt, ˈpær-)

n.
1. a father or a mother.
2. a source, origin, or cause.
3. any organism that produces another.
4. a precursor; progenitor.
adj.
5. being the original source.
6. pertaining to an organism, cell, or structure that produces another.
7. of or designating a corporation or other enterprise that owns controlling interests in one or more subsidiaries.
v.t.
8. to be or act as parent of.
[1375–1425; late Middle English (< Middle French) < Latin parent-, s. of parēns, n. use of present participle of parere to bring forth, breed]
par′ent•hood`, n.

parent

  • abdicate - Implies a giving up of sovereign power or the evasion of responsibility (as a parent).
  • half blood - Relationship through only one parent.
  • in loco parentis - Latin for "in the place of a parent."
  • patrial - Means having the right to live in the UK through the British birth of a parent or grandparent.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.parent - a father or motherparent - a father or mother; one who begets or one who gives birth to or nurtures and raises a child; a relative who plays the role of guardian
family unit, family - primary social group; parents and children; "he wanted to have a good job before starting a family"
adopter, adoptive parent - a person who adopts a child of other parents as his or her own child
empty nester - a parent whose children have grown up and left home
begetter, father, male parent - a male parent (also used as a term of address to your father); "his father was born in Atlanta"
filicide - a parent who murders his own son or daughter
genitor - a natural father or mother
female parent, mother - a woman who has given birth to a child (also used as a term of address to your mother); "the mother of three children"
stepparent - the spouse of your parent by a subsequent marriage
child, kid - a human offspring (son or daughter) of any age; "they had three children"; "they were able to send their kids to college"
2.parent - an organism (plant or animal) from which younger ones are obtained
organism, being - a living thing that has (or can develop) the ability to act or function independently
Verb1.parent - bring up; "raise a family"; "bring up children"
fledge - feed, care for, and rear young birds for flight
cradle - bring up from infancy
foster - bring up under fosterage; of children

parent

noun
1. father or mother, sire, progenitor, begetter, procreator, old (Austral. & N.Z. informal), patriarch Both her parents were killed in a car crash.
2. source, cause, author, root, origin, architect, creator, prototype, forerunner, originator, wellspring He is regarded as one of the parents of modern classical music.
verb
1. bring up, raise, look after, rear, nurture, be the parent of Some people are unwilling to parent a child with special needs.
Quotations
"Honour thy father and thy mother" Bible: Exodus
"Parents love their children more than children love their parents" Auctoritates Aristotelis
"Children begin by loving their parents; after a time they judge them; rarely, if ever, do they forgive them" [Oscar Wilde A Woman of No Importance]
"The most difficult job in the world is not being President. It's being a parent" [Bill Clinton]
"Parents ... are sometimes a bit of a disappointment to their children. They don't fulfil the promise of their early years" [Anthony Powell A Buyer's Market]
"They fuck you up, your Mum and Dad."
"They may not mean to, but they do."
"They fill you with the faults they had"
"And add some extra, just for you" [Philip Larkin This Be the Verse]
"The first half of our life is ruined by our parents and the second half by our children" [Clarence Darrow]

parent

nounverb
To cause to come into existence:
Translations
أحَدُ الوالِدَينوالِدٌ أوْ وَالِدَةٌوالِد بالتَّبَنّي
rodič-kaosvojitel
forælderstedforælder
vanhempiemokasvattaaottovanhempisyntyperä
roditelj
szülõ
foreldri
아버지
gimdytojastėvų
audžumāteaudžutēvsmātetēvs
osvojiteľrodič
starši
förälder
พ่อหรือแม่
annebabaebeveynevlât edinmiş kimse
bố hoặc mẹ

parent

[ˈpɛərənt]
A. Npadre m/madre f parentspadres mpl
B. ADJ the parent plantla planta madre
C. CPD parent company Ncasa f matriz
parent teacher association Nasociación f de padres de familia y profesores

parent

[ˈpɛərənt]
nparent m parent company, parent group, parent body, parent-teacher meeting
nplparents mpl
my parents → mes parents

parent

n
Elternteil m; parentsEltern pl; the duties of a parentdie elterlichen Pflichten; his father was his favourite parentvon seinen Eltern hatte er seinen Vater am liebsten
(fig)Vorläufer m; the Copernican theory is the parent of modern astronomydie moderne Astronomie geht auf die Lehren des Kopernikus zurück
attr parent birdsVogeleltern pl; parent plantMutterpflanze f; parent ship (Space) → Mutterschiff nt

parent

[ˈpɛərnt] npadre m (or madre f)
his parents → i suoi genitori

parent

(ˈpeərənt) noun
1. one of the two persons etc (one male and one female) who are jointly the cause of one's birth.
2. a person with the legal position of a mother or father eg by adoption.
ˈparentage (-tidʒ) noun
family or ancestry. a man of unknown parentage.
parental (pəˈrentl) adjective
parental responsibility.
ˈparenthood noun
the state of being a parent.

parent

والِدٌ أوْ وَالِدَةٌ rodič forælder Elternteil γονέας uno de los padres vanhempi parent roditelj genitore 아버지 ouder forelder rodzic pai родитель förälder พ่อหรือแม่ ebeveyn bố hoặc mẹ 父亲或母亲

par·ent

n. padre o madre; pl.
___ -spadres.

parent

n padre m, madre f; npl padres mpl; adoptive parents padres adoptivos; biologic parents padres biológicos
References in classic literature ?
Anything you say," replies the shortsighted parent, preparing herself to sing, "The Three Little Kittens" half a dozen times over, or to take her family to "Buy a penny bun," regardless of wind or limb.
By no means," returned Heyward, anxious to recall his error, if he had made one; "the white man may, and does often, forget the burial place of his fathers; he sometimes ceases to remember those he should love, and has promised to cherish; but the affection of a parent for his child is never permitted to die.
Unhappily the road was deserted in the still powerful sunlight, and he was obliged to seek the cover of the woods, with a passing compliment to the parent of his charges.
God, as a direct consequence of the sin which man thus punished, had given her a lovely child, whose place was on that same dishonoured bosom, to connect her parent for ever with the race and descent of mortals, and to be finally a blessed soul in heaven
Ignorance is the parent of fear, and being completely nonplussed and confounded about the stranger, i confess i was now as much afraid of him as if it was the devil himself who had thus broken into my room at the dead of night.
I have taught them the duties of the family, of parent and child, and husband and wife; and how can I bear to have this open acknowledgment that we care for no tie, no duty, no relation, however sacred, compared with money?
Tom was introduced to the Judge; but his tongue was tied, his breath would hardly come, his heart quaked -- partly because of the awful greatness of the man, but mainly because he was her parent.
The parent who is obliged to feed and clothe seven children on an income of fifteen dollars a month seldom has time to discriminate carefully between the various members of her brood, but Hannah at fourteen was at once companion and partner in all her mother's problems.
There will be enough for every hope and every fear; and though my attachment to none can equal that of a parent, it suits my ideas of comfort better than what is warmer and blinder.
The old well-established grievance of duty against will, parent against child, was the cause of all.
It must have been most irksome to find herself bound by a hard-wrung pledge to stand in the stead of a parent to a strange child she could not love, and to see an uncongenial alien permanently intruded on her own family group.
In later years, when Frank had reached the age of seventeen, the same curious shifting of the relative positions of parent and friend between the two neighbors was exemplified more absurdly than ever.