parentheses


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parentheses

Parentheses ( ( ) ) are used to separate information that is not necessary to the structure or meaning of the surrounding text.
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pa·ren·the·sis

 (pə-rĕn′thĭ-sĭs)
n. pl. par·en·the·ses (-sēz′)
1. Either or both of the upright curved lines, ( ), used to mark off explanatory or qualifying remarks in writing or printing or enclose a sum, product, or other expression considered or treated as a collective entity in a mathematical operation.
2.
a. A qualifying or amplifying word, phrase, or sentence inserted within written matter in such a way as to be independent of the surrounding grammatical structure.
b. A comment departing from the theme of discourse; a digression.
3. An interruption of continuity; an interval: "This is one of the things I wasn't prepared for—the amount of unfilled time, the long parentheses of nothing" (Margaret Atwood).

[Late Latin, insertion of a letter or syllable in a word, from Greek, from parentithenai, to insert : para-, beside; see para-1 + en-, in; see en in Indo-European roots + tithenai, to put; see dhē- in Indo-European roots.]
square brackets, parentheses, braces - Square brackets were formerly called crotchets, round brackets are commonly called parentheses, and curly brackets are called braces; the punctuation called brackets derives from the bookshelf type, implying that, in writing, these marks "lift up" a section of a sentence.
See also related terms for punctuation.

parentheses

A pair of punctuation marks, ( ), used to enclose explanatory or qualifying words. Compare brackets.
Translations
závorka
parenteser
sulkeet
zagrade
括弧
괄호
oklepaj
parentes
ในวงเล็บ
dấu ngoặc đơn

parentheses

أَقْواس závorka parenteser Klammern παρενθέσεις paréntesis sulkeet parenthèses zagrade parentesi 括弧 괄호 haakjes parentes nawiasy parênteses скобки parentes ในวงเล็บ köşeli parantez dấu ngoặc đơn 括号
References in classic literature ?
I wish to add one remark, here--in parentheses, so to speak --suggested by the word "snowy," which I have just used.
Let the reader imagine the effect in the midst of a theatrical piece, of the yelping of an usher, flinging in between two rhymes, and often in the middle of a line, parentheses like the following,--
Bert reassured his brother by a glimpse of a partly eaten swede, and was still telling his story in fragments and parentheses, when he discovered behind the counter a yellow and forgotten note addressed to himself.
The effect of these parentheses, whether they were introduced for that purpose or represented a natural instinct on Mrs.
Somebody put a drop under a magnifying-glass and it was all semicolons and parentheses," said Mrs.
Next, in parentheses, was regret at having spent so much money in Yokohama.
One of the most confusing parts of these formulas is counting the correct number of closing parentheses to use.
Parentheses is a true story and revolves around the life, death, and rebirth of a man who wanted a "differing view" of his life--and received it when he 'died' from cardiac arrest and was resuscitated only to face a new life with new physical disabilities and possible brain damage.
Treating parentheses as a poetic device, the paper divides their usage into seven categories, providing representative examples from throughout Cummings's writing.
Parentheses are used in mathematics to indicate that certain computations should precede other computations, and also to shorten expressions by virtue of the "distributive law" that says A x (B + C) = (A x B) + (A x C).
To spell out the bonus words, unscramble the letters in parentheses.
Vernon Fisher's oblique 2002-2003 homage to David's Death of Marat, 1793, is an ingenious take on art's tragic postmodern condition: a fragment of wood bearing a dismal Romantic skyscape, bracketed by black wall-mounted parentheses (and thus "under suspension," as Edmund Husserl might say, but not "under erasure," a la Derrida), and accompanied by a kitschy cutout illustration of a toppled paint can and spilled black paint that nods to the death of painting.