pariah


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pa·ri·ah

 (pə-rī′ə)
n.
1. A social outcast: "Shortly Tom came upon the juvenile pariah of the village, Huckleberry Finn, son of the town drunkard" (Mark Twain).
2. A Dalit.

[From Tamil paṟaiyan, member of a Dalit group of southern India traditionally performing as drummers and performing other tasks considered unclean (from paṛai, festival drum) and its Malayalam equivalent, paṟayan (from paṛa, festival drum).]
Word History: Pariah comes from Tamil paṟaiyan and its Malayalam equivalent paṟayan, words that refer to a member of a Dalit group of southern India and Sri Lanka that had very low status in the traditional caste system of India. (The plural of the Tamil word paṟaiyan is paṟaiyar. The symbol in this Tamil word transliterates a letter pronounced as an alveolar trill in some dialects of Tamil, while it transliterates a letter pronounced as an alveolar liquid in Malayalam.) Because of their low status, the paṟaiyar found work performing undesirable tasks considered ritually impure by members of the higher castes, such as disposing of the corpses of dead cattle and performing music and carrying out other functions at funerals. The term paṟaiyar is derived from paṟai (in Malayalam, paṟa), a name of a kind of drum played as part of certain festivals and ceremonies. Players of this drum have traditionally been drawn from the paṟaiyar group. The word pariah begins to appear in English in travelers' accounts of Indian society and at first refers specifically to the low-status paṟaiyar. One such occurrence of the word dates from as early as 1613. As British colonial power began to expand in India, however, the British began to use the word pariah in a general sense for any Indian person considered an outcaste or simply of low caste in the traditional Indian caste system. By the 1800s, pariah had come to be used of any person who is despised, reviled, or shunned.

pariah

(pəˈraɪə; ˈpærɪə)
n
1. (Sociology) a social outcast
2. (Sociology) (formerly) a member of a low caste in S India
[C17: from Tamil paraiyan drummer, from parai drum; so called because members of the caste were the drummers at festivals]

pa•ri•ah

(pəˈraɪ ə)

n.
2. any person or animal that is generally despised or avoided.
[1605–15; < Tamil paṟaiyar, pl. of paṟaiyan member of a low caste in S India, literally, drummer (from a hereditary duty of the caste), derivative of paṟai a festival drum]

pariah

A person regarded as being an outcast from society.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pariah - a person who is rejected (from society or home)
unfortunate, unfortunate person - a person who suffers misfortune
heretic, misbeliever, religious outcast - a person who holds religious beliefs in conflict with the dogma of the Roman Catholic Church
leper - a pariah who is avoided by others
Harijan, untouchable - belongs to lowest social and ritual class in India

pariah

noun outcast, exile, outlaw, undesirable, untouchable, leper, unperson I was treated like a pariah for the rest of the journey.
Translations
مَنْبوذ
vyděděnec
pariaudskud
pária
úrhrak
parijas
izstumtaispārijs
toplum dışına itilmiş kimse

pariah

[ˈpærɪə] Nparia mf

pariah

n (lit)Paria m; (fig also)Ausgestoßene(r) mf

pariah

[pəˈraɪə] n (frm) → paria m inv

pariah

(pəˈraiə) noun
a person driven out of a group or community; an outcast. Because of his political beliefs he became a pariah in the district.
References in classic literature ?
Shortly Tom came upon the juvenile pariah of the village, Huckleberry Finn, son of the town drunkard.
All over the plain, cattle and buffaloes were grazing, and when the little boys in charge of the herds saw Mowgli they shouted and ran away, and the yellow pariah dogs that hang about every Indian village barked.
I heard Vixen squeal; half a dozen of the curs closed in on her; a white streak came up behind me; a cloud of dust rose near Vixen, and, when it cleared, I saw one tall pariah with his back broken, and the bull wrenching another to earth.
He explained to me, keeping his eyes straight in front of him, that he had met this dog (he called him awful names) walking alone, and was going to take him to the Fort to be killed for a masterless pariah.
I said that Garin did not seem to me much of a pariah, but that he had better take him to the Fort if he thought best.
But Kim had danced off ere the end of the sentence, dodging pariah dogs and hungry acquaintances.
The night-scavenger, the pariah, the miserable, the despised, the man without caste
Pariah, generally considered one to leave alone by most punters on the northern circuit, proved a revelation in the handicap chase, forging right away from Singing Sand.
It also prohibits domestic firms from selling images to such pariah states as North Korea, Iraq, and Libya.
Pariah is a solid, fun-packed and challenging game.
He said Gaddafi's initiative had cleared the way for the lifting of US sanctions against Libya, which could now rejoin the international community after more than a decade as a pariah state.
NEW YORK - Several weeks ago, when it became obvious to Hee-Seop Choi that he was becoming a pariah among the ever-increasing number of Dodgers pitchers who had been burned by his maddening inability to field groundballs, the strapping first baseman asked infield coach Glenn Hoffman for some individual tutoring.