parishioner


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pa·rish·ion·er

 (pə-rĭsh′ə-nər)
n.
A member of a parish.

[Middle English, from parishon, parishioner, from Old French parochien, from parroche, parish; see parish.]

parishioner

(pəˈrɪʃənə)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a member of a particular parish
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a member of a particular parish

pa•rish•ion•er

(pəˈrɪʃ ə nər)

n.
one of the members or inhabitants of a parish.
[1425–75; late Middle English; earlier parishion, Middle English paroschian, -ien, -en < Old French paroissien. See parish, -ian, -er1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.parishioner - a member of a parishparishioner - a member of a parish      
parish - a local church community
church member, churchgoer - a religious person who goes to church regularly
Translations

parishioner

[pəˈrɪʃənəʳ] Nfeligrés/esa m/f

parishioner

[pəˈrɪʃər] nparoissien(ne) m/fparish magazine nmagazine m paroissialparish priest n (Catholic)curé m; (Protestant)pasteur mparish records nregistres mpl paroissiaux

parishioner

nGemeinde(mit)glied nt

parishioner

[pəˈrɪʃənəʳ] nparrocchiano/a
References in classic literature ?
This idea was countenanced by the strong interest which the physician ever manifested in the young clergyman; he attached himself to him as a parishioner, and sought to win a friendly regard and confidence from his naturally reserved sensibility.
He entered with an almost noiseless step, bent his head mildly to the pews on each side, and bowed as he passed his oldest parishioner, a white-haired great grandsire, who occupied an arm-chair in the centre of the aisle.
Chaloner, the rector's wife, was among the earliest customers at the shop, thinking it only right to encourage a new parishioner who had made a decorous appearance at church; and she found Mr.
But, my good friend, what will you do then with your fellow- parishioner who opposes your husband in the vestry?
After all, he knew nothing about them, and pension joys, pension sorrows, are flimsy things; whereas Lucy would be his parishioner.
You're about, I hear, to marry the daughter of my parishioner and son in the spirit, Prince Shtcherbatsky?
That worthy couple were delayed by a portentous old parishioner of the female gender, who was one of the plagues of their lives, and with whom they bore with most exemplary sweetness and good- humour, notwithstanding her having an infection of absurdity about her, that communicated itself to everything with which, and everybody with whom, she came in contact.
The days were gone when people could be greatly wrought upon by their faith, still less change it; the Catholics were formidable because they would lay hold of government and property, and burn men alive; not because any sane and honest parishioner of St.
He was only one among several landed parishioners, but he alone was honoured with the title of Squire; for though Mr.
Thou best thyself more like a thief and a heretic,'' said the Friar, equally indignant; ``I will pouch up no such affront before my parishioners, as thou thinkest it not shame to put upon me, although I be a reverend brother to thee.
For I would have you know, Sir Errant, that in these little villages everything is talked about and everything is carped at, and rest assured, as I am, that the priest must be over and above good who forces his parishioners to speak well of him, especially in villages.
Elizabeth was chiefly struck by his extraordinary deference for Lady Catherine, and his kind intention of christening, marrying, and burying his parishioners whenever it were required.