parody

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Related to parodists: parodic, lampooned

par·o·dy

 (păr′ə-dē)
n. pl. par·o·dies
1.
a. A literary or artistic work that uses imitation, as of the characteristic style of an author or a work, for comic effect or ridicule.
b. A genre, as in literature, comprising such works.
2. Something so bad as to be equivalent to intentional mockery; a travesty: The trial was a parody of justice.
3. Music The practice of reworking an already established composition, especially the incorporation into the Mass of material borrowed from other works, such as motets or madrigals.
tr.v. par·o·died, par·o·dy·ing, par·o·dies
To make a parody of. See Synonyms at imitate.

[Latin parōdia, from Greek parōidiā : para-, subsidiary to; see para-1 + aoidē, ōidē, song; see wed- in Indo-European roots.]

pa·rod′ic (pə-rŏd′ĭk), pa·rod′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
par′o·dist n.
par′o·dis′tic adj.

parody

(ˈpærədɪ)
n, pl -dies
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a musical, literary, or other composition that mimics the style of another composer, author, etc, in a humorous or satirical way
2. (Music, other) a musical, literary, or other composition that mimics the style of another composer, author, etc, in a humorous or satirical way
3. mimicry of someone's individual manner in a humorous or satirical way
4. something so badly done as to seem an intentional mockery; travesty
vb, -dies, -dying or -died
(tr) to make a parody of
[C16: via Latin from Greek paroidiā satirical poem, from para-1 + ōidē song]
parodic, paˈrodical adj
ˈparodist n

par•o•dy

(ˈpær ə di)

n., pl. -dies, n.
1. a humorous or satirical imitation of a serious piece of literature or writing.
2. the genre of literary composition represented by such imitations.
3. any humorous, satirical, or burlesque imitation, as of a person, event, etc.
4. a burlesque imitation of a musical composition.
5. a poor or feeble imitation; travesty.
v.t.
6. to imitate (a composition, author, etc.) for purposes of ridicule or satire.
7. to imitate feebly; travesty.
[1590–1600; < Latin parōdia < Greek parōidía a burlesque song or poem. See par-, ode, -y3]
par′o•di•a•ble, adj.
syn: See burlesque.

parody


Past participle: parodied
Gerund: parodying

Imperative
parody
parody
Present
I parody
you parody
he/she/it parodies
we parody
you parody
they parody
Preterite
I parodied
you parodied
he/she/it parodied
we parodied
you parodied
they parodied
Present Continuous
I am parodying
you are parodying
he/she/it is parodying
we are parodying
you are parodying
they are parodying
Present Perfect
I have parodied
you have parodied
he/she/it has parodied
we have parodied
you have parodied
they have parodied
Past Continuous
I was parodying
you were parodying
he/she/it was parodying
we were parodying
you were parodying
they were parodying
Past Perfect
I had parodied
you had parodied
he/she/it had parodied
we had parodied
you had parodied
they had parodied
Future
I will parody
you will parody
he/she/it will parody
we will parody
you will parody
they will parody
Future Perfect
I will have parodied
you will have parodied
he/she/it will have parodied
we will have parodied
you will have parodied
they will have parodied
Future Continuous
I will be parodying
you will be parodying
he/she/it will be parodying
we will be parodying
you will be parodying
they will be parodying
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been parodying
you have been parodying
he/she/it has been parodying
we have been parodying
you have been parodying
they have been parodying
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been parodying
you will have been parodying
he/she/it will have been parodying
we will have been parodying
you will have been parodying
they will have been parodying
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been parodying
you had been parodying
he/she/it had been parodying
we had been parodying
you had been parodying
they had been parodying
Conditional
I would parody
you would parody
he/she/it would parody
we would parody
you would parody
they would parody
Past Conditional
I would have parodied
you would have parodied
he/she/it would have parodied
we would have parodied
you would have parodied
they would have parodied

parody

Imitating another work or style with intention to ridicule.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.parody - a composition that imitates or misrepresents somebody's style, usually in a humorous wayparody - a composition that imitates or misrepresents somebody's style, usually in a humorous way
caricature, impersonation, imitation - a representation of a person that is exaggerated for comic effect
2.parody - humorous or satirical mimicry
apery, mimicry - the act of mimicking; imitative behavior
Verb1.parody - make a spoof of or make fun of
act, play, represent - play a role or part; "Gielgud played Hamlet"; "She wants to act Lady Macbeth, but she is too young for the role"; "She played the servant to her husband's master"
2.parody - make a parody of; "The students spoofed the teachers"
mock - imitate with mockery and derision; "The children mocked their handicapped classmate"
travesty - make a travesty of

parody

noun
1. takeoff (informal), imitation, satire, caricature, send-up (Brit. informal), spoof (informal), lampoon, skit, burlesque a parody of a well-know soap opera
2. travesty, farce, caricature, mockery, apology for His trial was a parody of justice.
verb
1. take off (informal), mimic, caricature, send up (Brit. informal), spoof (informal), travesty, lampoon, poke fun at, burlesque, take the piss out of (taboo slang), satirize, do a takeoff of (informal) It was easy to parody his rather pompous manner of speaking.

parody

noun
1. A usually amusing caricature of another:
Informal: takeoff.
2. A false, derisive, or impudent imitation of something:
verb
To copy (the manner or expression of another), especially in an exaggerated or mocking way:
Translations
مُحاكاة تَهَكُّمِيَّهمُحاكاة سَيِّئَهيُحاكي بصورةٍ ساخِرَه
parodieparodovat
parodiparodiereefterligne
parodiaparodioida
paródiaparodizálutánzat
skopstælaskopstæling, parodíaskrumskæling
parodijaparodijuoti
kropļojums, parodijaparodētparodija
parodiaparodiować
parodovať
alay yoluyla yermekhicvetmekhicviyekötü taklitparodi

parody

[ˈpærədɪ]
A. Nparodia f
B. VTparodiar

parody

[ˈpærədi]
nparodie f
The film was a brilliant parody of American life → Le film était une géniale parodie du mode de vie américain.
vtparodier
a sketch parodying his views → un sketch parodiant ses vues

parody

n
Parodie f (→ of auf +acc)
(= travesty)Abklatsch m; a parody of justiceeine Parodie auf die Gerechtigkeit
vtparodieren

parody

[ˈpærədɪ]
1. nparodia
2. vtparodiare

parody

(ˈpӕrədi) plural ˈparodies noun
1. an amusing imitation of a serious author's style of writing. He writes parodies of John Donne's poems.
2. a very bad imitation. a parody of the truth.
verb
to make a parody of (something or someone).
References in periodicals archive ?
Indeed, when those Trump parodists get it right - as with Alec Baldwin's famous portrayal on American show Saturday Night Live - the results can be very, very funny indeed.
Is it possible that they are both ironic parodists and earnest actors .
55) Many Jewish comedians in the United States such as Lenny Bruce and Woody Allen have been excellent parodists.
He had begun to show the tendencies, both personal and artistic, that laid the grounds for parodists of his style and of his persona.
In an inspired piece of re-reappropriation, De Backer, the man behind the song himself, turned these teeming ranks of parodists into a crowdsourced 'orchestra', remixing individual components from dozens of videos into its own homage-to-a-homage-to-a-homage, with dogs, puppets, Dutch choirs, guitar teachers, animations and political satires all (refused as compositional elements.
She was not attracted to the distinctive voices of other authors, so frequently the essence that parodists attempt to capture and repurpose.
The book tells, as Bates puts it, "two intertwined stories," of "how Wordsworth used supplementary writings to shape and engage readers in his poetic collections" and "how Wordsworth's critics and parodists responded to and were connected with the designs of those collections" (1).
Theatre's funniest parodists as Holmes and Watson embark on their most dangerous adventure yet .
While a commercial parodist such as the makers of South Park may be willing to engage in those costs, parodists and copyright users of more modest or nonprofit means may forgo or withdraw their use, particularly when learning that they are threatened with an infringement claim.
2) Keith Hopper has noted the attraction both authors felt toward the anti-Cartesianism found in the work of early parodists such as Swift and Sterne (Hopper 226-8).
Other postmodern parodists attack physical or religious discourses-as in David Lodge's Changing Places (1975), or Salman Rushdie's Shame (1983).
The Act has no hint of an evidentiary preference for parodists over