parody


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par·o·dy

 (păr′ə-dē)
n. pl. par·o·dies
1.
a. A literary or artistic work that uses imitation, as of the characteristic style of an author or a work, for comic effect or ridicule.
b. A genre, as in literature, comprising such works.
2. Something so bad as to be equivalent to intentional mockery; a travesty: The trial was a parody of justice.
3. Music The practice of reworking an already established composition, especially the incorporation into the Mass of material borrowed from other works, such as motets or madrigals.
tr.v. par·o·died, par·o·dy·ing, par·o·dies
To make a parody of. See Synonyms at imitate.

[Latin parōdia, from Greek parōidiā : para-, subsidiary to; see para-1 + aoidē, ōidē, song; see wed- in Indo-European roots.]

pa·rod′ic (pə-rŏd′ĭk), pa·rod′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
par′o·dist n.
par′o·dis′tic adj.

parody

(ˈpærədɪ)
n, pl -dies
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a musical, literary, or other composition that mimics the style of another composer, author, etc, in a humorous or satirical way
2. (Music, other) a musical, literary, or other composition that mimics the style of another composer, author, etc, in a humorous or satirical way
3. mimicry of someone's individual manner in a humorous or satirical way
4. something so badly done as to seem an intentional mockery; travesty
vb, -dies, -dying or -died
(tr) to make a parody of
[C16: via Latin from Greek paroidiā satirical poem, from para-1 + ōidē song]
parodic, paˈrodical adj
ˈparodist n

par•o•dy

(ˈpær ə di)

n., pl. -dies, n.
1. a humorous or satirical imitation of a serious piece of literature or writing.
2. the genre of literary composition represented by such imitations.
3. any humorous, satirical, or burlesque imitation, as of a person, event, etc.
4. a burlesque imitation of a musical composition.
5. a poor or feeble imitation; travesty.
v.t.
6. to imitate (a composition, author, etc.) for purposes of ridicule or satire.
7. to imitate feebly; travesty.
[1590–1600; < Latin parōdia < Greek parōidía a burlesque song or poem. See par-, ode, -y3]
par′o•di•a•ble, adj.
syn: See burlesque.

parody


Past participle: parodied
Gerund: parodying

Imperative
parody
parody
Present
I parody
you parody
he/she/it parodies
we parody
you parody
they parody
Preterite
I parodied
you parodied
he/she/it parodied
we parodied
you parodied
they parodied
Present Continuous
I am parodying
you are parodying
he/she/it is parodying
we are parodying
you are parodying
they are parodying
Present Perfect
I have parodied
you have parodied
he/she/it has parodied
we have parodied
you have parodied
they have parodied
Past Continuous
I was parodying
you were parodying
he/she/it was parodying
we were parodying
you were parodying
they were parodying
Past Perfect
I had parodied
you had parodied
he/she/it had parodied
we had parodied
you had parodied
they had parodied
Future
I will parody
you will parody
he/she/it will parody
we will parody
you will parody
they will parody
Future Perfect
I will have parodied
you will have parodied
he/she/it will have parodied
we will have parodied
you will have parodied
they will have parodied
Future Continuous
I will be parodying
you will be parodying
he/she/it will be parodying
we will be parodying
you will be parodying
they will be parodying
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been parodying
you have been parodying
he/she/it has been parodying
we have been parodying
you have been parodying
they have been parodying
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been parodying
you will have been parodying
he/she/it will have been parodying
we will have been parodying
you will have been parodying
they will have been parodying
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been parodying
you had been parodying
he/she/it had been parodying
we had been parodying
you had been parodying
they had been parodying
Conditional
I would parody
you would parody
he/she/it would parody
we would parody
you would parody
they would parody
Past Conditional
I would have parodied
you would have parodied
he/she/it would have parodied
we would have parodied
you would have parodied
they would have parodied

parody

Imitating another work or style with intention to ridicule.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.parody - a composition that imitates or misrepresents somebody's style, usually in a humorous wayparody - a composition that imitates or misrepresents somebody's style, usually in a humorous way
caricature, impersonation, imitation - a representation of a person that is exaggerated for comic effect
2.parody - humorous or satirical mimicry
apery, mimicry - the act of mimicking; imitative behavior
Verb1.parody - make a spoof of or make fun of
act, play, represent - play a role or part; "Gielgud played Hamlet"; "She wants to act Lady Macbeth, but she is too young for the role"; "She played the servant to her husband's master"
2.parody - make a parody of; "The students spoofed the teachers"
mock - imitate with mockery and derision; "The children mocked their handicapped classmate"
travesty - make a travesty of

parody

noun
1. takeoff (informal), imitation, satire, caricature, send-up (Brit. informal), spoof (informal), lampoon, skit, burlesque a parody of a well-know soap opera
2. travesty, farce, caricature, mockery, apology for His trial was a parody of justice.
verb
1. take off (informal), mimic, caricature, send up (Brit. informal), spoof (informal), travesty, lampoon, poke fun at, burlesque, take the piss out of (taboo slang), satirize, do a takeoff of (informal) It was easy to parody his rather pompous manner of speaking.

parody

noun
1. A usually amusing caricature of another:
Informal: takeoff.
2. A false, derisive, or impudent imitation of something:
verb
To copy (the manner or expression of another), especially in an exaggerated or mocking way:
Translations
مُحاكاة تَهَكُّمِيَّهمُحاكاة سَيِّئَهيُحاكي بصورةٍ ساخِرَه
parodieparodovat
parodiparodiereefterligne
parodiaparodioida
paródiaparodizálutánzat
skopstælaskopstæling, parodíaskrumskæling
parodijaparodijuoti
kropļojums, parodijaparodētparodija
parodiaparodiować
parodovať
alay yoluyla yermekhicvetmekhicviyekötü taklitparodi

parody

[ˈpærədɪ]
A. Nparodia f
B. VTparodiar

parody

[ˈpærədi]
nparodie f
The film was a brilliant parody of American life → Le film était une géniale parodie du mode de vie américain.
vtparodier
a sketch parodying his views → un sketch parodiant ses vues

parody

n
Parodie f (→ of auf +acc)
(= travesty)Abklatsch m; a parody of justiceeine Parodie auf die Gerechtigkeit
vtparodieren

parody

[ˈpærədɪ]
1. nparodia
2. vtparodiare

parody

(ˈpӕrədi) plural ˈparodies noun
1. an amusing imitation of a serious author's style of writing. He writes parodies of John Donne's poems.
2. a very bad imitation. a parody of the truth.
verb
to make a parody of (something or someone).
References in classic literature ?
It was some foul parody, some infamous ignoble satire.
It is anticipated at the beginning by the dream of Socrates and the parody of Homer.
Every soul aboard stood at the bulwarks or on the seats of the steamer and stared at that distant shape, higher than the trees or church towers inland, and advancing with a leisurely parody of a human stride.
As for me," thought Porthos, giving Mordaunt his whole attention, "were it not for breaking in on the majesty of the situation I would leap down from the bench, reach Mordaunt in three bounds and strangle him; I would then take him by the feet and knock the life out of these wretched musketeers who parody the musketeers of France.
At every other point the king was an absurd parody of the Professor.
The witticism which will inspire this evening is as yet in Mr Todd's pretty reticent intellect, or locked in the jewelled bosoms of our city's gayest leaders; but there is talk of a pretty parody of the simple manners and customs at the other end of Society's scale.
The things that had filled his days seemed now like a nursery parody of life, or like the wrangles of mediaeval schoolmen over metaphysical terms that nobody had ever understood.
Let the creed and commandments even have the saucy homage of parody.
I will be wife to no buffoon; to no clumsy old clown; to no debauched, degraded parody of a man.
Another paper, in deadly seriousness, reproving Helen Della Delmar for her parody, said: "But unquestionably Miss Delmar wrote it in a moment of badinage and not quite with the respect that one great poet should show to another and perhaps to the greatest.
It is a parody of the warlike epic, but has little in it that is really comic or of literary merit, except perhaps the list of quaint arms assumed by the warriors.
Sometimes, in the later period, altogether original and very realistic scenes from actual English life were added, like the very clever but very coarse parody on the Nativity play in the 'Towneley' cycle.