paronychia


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Related to paronychia: herpetic whitlow

par·o·nych·i·a

 (păr′ə-nĭk′ē-ə)
n.
Inflammation of the tissue surrounding a fingernail or toenail.

[Latin parōnychia, from Greek parōnukhiā : para-, around; see para-1 + onux, onukh-, nail; see nogh- in Indo-European roots.]

par′o·nych′i·al adj.

paronychia

(ˌpærəˈnɪkɪə)
n
(Medicine) a bacterial or fungal infection where the nail and skin meet on toes or fingers

par•o•nych•i•a

(ˌpær əˈnɪk i ə)

n.
inflammation of the folds of skin bordering a nail of a finger or toe; felon.
[1590–1600; < Latin parōnychia < Greek parōnychía whitlow =par- par- + onych- (s. of ónyx) claw, nail + -ia -ia]
par`o•nych′i•al, adj.

paronychia

a pus-producing inflammation at the base of a fingernail or toenail; a felon or whitlow. Also called panaris.
See also: Fingers and Toes
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.paronychia - infection in the tissues adjacent to a nail on a finger or toe
infection - the pathological state resulting from the invasion of the body by pathogenic microorganisms
2.Paronychia - low-growing annual or perennial herbs or woody plants; whitlowworts
caryophylloid dicot genus - genus of relatively early dicotyledonous plants including mostly flowers
carnation family, Caryophyllaceae, family Caryophyllaceae, pink family - large family of herbs or subshrubs (usually with stems swollen at the nodes)
whitlowwort - any of various low-growing tufted plants of the genus Paronychia having tiny greenish flowers and usually whorled leaves; widespread throughout warm regions of both Old and New Worlds; formerly thought to cure whitlows (suppurative infections around a fingernail)
Translations
Paronychie

par·o·nych·i·a

n. paroniquia, infl. del área adyacente a la uña.

paronychia

n paroniquia
References in periodicals archive ?
Meanwhile, the many targeted therapies approved over the past decade interfere with specific molecules needed for tumor growth, but they also are associated with a wide range of skin, hair, and nail side effects that include skin growths, itching, paronychia, and more.
In chronic paronychia, often seen in women who are cooks, nurses or florists who have hands often immersed in water, the matrix of the nail can be involved causing characteristic transverse ridging of the nail plate.
aspx) Mercola, some of the harmful effects of nail-biting can be disease-causing bacteria and an array of germs being transferred into one's body, paronychia (a skin infection caused by bacteria, yeast, and other microorganisms entering the damaged cuticles surrounding the nails), warts&nbsp;on one's fingers caused by human papillomavirus, dental problems and impaired quality of life.
1,6] In addition, the infectious flora was described with species such as Staphylococcus aureus and beta-haemolytic streptococci which were frequently isolated from abscesses, whitlows, paronychia or infected eczema.
Ingrown toenail and paronychia have been reported secondary to drugs, such as indinavir and indinavir / ritonavir combination.
Despite being given antibiotics by out-of-hours medical staff at Ysbyty Glan Clwyd, who said she had an infection called paronychia, her thumb became more swollen and a pus-filled blister (pustule) formed.
Despite being given antibiotics by out of hours medical staff at Ysbyty Glan Clwyd, who said she had an infection called paronychia, her thumb became more swollen and a puss-filled blister formed.
Infection beginning as a paronychia (infection of the structures surrounding the nail; also called a whitlow), the most common type of Candida onychomycosis, first appears as an edematous, reddened pad surrounding the nail plate.
Rare variants of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis: whitlow, paronychia, and sporotrichoid.
Brassicaceae BROMELIACEAE Bromeliaceae morfotipo 1 Bromeliaceae morfotipo 2 CACTACEAE Opuntia ficus-indica CARYOPHYLLACEAE Caryophyllaceae morfotipo 1 Caryophyllaceae morfotipo 2 Paronychia sp.
Another person who worked at both LTCFs reported having paronychia that was treated with antimicrobial drugs, and 1 staff member at home B reported a recurrent skin infection.