parry

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par·ry

 (păr′ē)
v. par·ried, par·ry·ing, par·ries
v.tr.
1. To deflect or ward off (a fencing thrust, for example).
2. To deflect, evade, or avoid: He skillfully parried the question with a clever reply.
v.intr.
To deflect or ward off a thrust or blow.
n. pl. par·ries
1. The deflecting or warding off of a thrust or blow, as in fencing.
2. An evasive answer or action.

[Probably from French parez, imperative of parer, to defend, from Italian parare, from Latin parāre, to prepare; see perə- in Indo-European roots.]

parry

(ˈpærɪ)
vb, -ries, -rying or -ried
1. (Fencing) to ward off (an attack) by blocking or deflecting, as in fencing
2. (tr) to evade (questions), esp adroitly
n, pl -ries
3. (Fencing) an act of parrying, esp (in fencing) using a stroke or circular motion of the blade
4. a skilful evasion, as of a question
[C17: from French parer to ward off, from Latin parāre to prepare]

Parry

(ˈpærɪ)
n
1. (Biography) Sir (Charles) Hubert (Hastings). 1848–1918, English composer, noted esp for his choral works
2. (Biography) Sir William Edward. 1790–1855, English arctic explorer, who searched for the Northwest Passage (1819–25) and attempted to reach the North Pole (1827)

par•ry

(ˈpær i)

v. -ried, -ry•ing, v.t.
1. to ward off (a sword thrust, blow, weapon, etc.).
2. to turn aside; dodge: to parry an embarrassing question.
v.i.
3. to parry a thrust, blow, etc.
n.
4. an act or instance of parrying.
[1665–75; < French parez, imperative of parer to ward off, set off < Latin parāre to set. See parade]
par′ri•er, n.

Par•ry

(ˈpær i)

n.
William Edward, 1790–1855, English arctic explorer.

parry


Past participle: parried
Gerund: parrying

Imperative
parry
parry
Present
I parry
you parry
he/she/it parries
we parry
you parry
they parry
Preterite
I parried
you parried
he/she/it parried
we parried
you parried
they parried
Present Continuous
I am parrying
you are parrying
he/she/it is parrying
we are parrying
you are parrying
they are parrying
Present Perfect
I have parried
you have parried
he/she/it has parried
we have parried
you have parried
they have parried
Past Continuous
I was parrying
you were parrying
he/she/it was parrying
we were parrying
you were parrying
they were parrying
Past Perfect
I had parried
you had parried
he/she/it had parried
we had parried
you had parried
they had parried
Future
I will parry
you will parry
he/she/it will parry
we will parry
you will parry
they will parry
Future Perfect
I will have parried
you will have parried
he/she/it will have parried
we will have parried
you will have parried
they will have parried
Future Continuous
I will be parrying
you will be parrying
he/she/it will be parrying
we will be parrying
you will be parrying
they will be parrying
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been parrying
you have been parrying
he/she/it has been parrying
we have been parrying
you have been parrying
they have been parrying
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been parrying
you will have been parrying
he/she/it will have been parrying
we will have been parrying
you will have been parrying
they will have been parrying
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been parrying
you had been parrying
he/she/it had been parrying
we had been parrying
you had been parrying
they had been parrying
Conditional
I would parry
you would parry
he/she/it would parry
we would parry
you would parry
they would parry
Past Conditional
I would have parried
you would have parried
he/she/it would have parried
we would have parried
you would have parried
they would have parried
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.parry - (fencing) blocking a lunge or deflecting it with a circular motion of the sword
blocking, block - the act of obstructing or deflecting someone's movements
fencing - the art or sport of fighting with swords (especially the use of foils or epees or sabres to score points under a set of rules)
2.parry - a return punch (especially by a boxer)parry - a return punch (especially by a boxer)
biff, punch, lick, clout, poke, slug - (boxing) a blow with the fist; "I gave him a clout on his nose"
Verb1.parry - impede the movement of (an opponent or a ball)parry - impede the movement of (an opponent or a ball); "block an attack"
fence - fight with fencing swords
2.parry - avoid or try to avoid fulfilling, answering, or performing (duties, questions, or issues); "He dodged the issue"; "she skirted the problem"; "They tend to evade their responsibilities"; "he evaded the questions skillfully"
beg - dodge, avoid answering, or take for granted; "beg the question"; "beg the point in the discussion"
quibble - evade the truth of a point or question by raising irrelevant objections
avoid - stay clear from; keep away from; keep out of the way of someone or something; "Her former friends now avoid her"

parry

verb
1. evade, avoid, fence off, dodge, duck (informal), shun, sidestep, circumvent, fight shy of He parried questions about his involvement in the affair.
2. ward off, block, deflect, repel, rebuff, fend off, stave off, repulse, hold at bay My opponent parried every blow I got close enough to attempt.

parry

verb
To turn or drive away:
Translations
torjunta
finteparering

parry

[ˈpærɪ] VT (Fencing) → parar; [+ blow] → parar, desviar; [+ attack] → rechazar, defenderse de (fig) → esquivar, eludir

parry

[ˈpæri] vt
[+ blow] → parer
[+ argument, question] → parer à

parry

n (Fencing, fig) → Parade f; (Boxing) → Abwehr f
vt (Fencing, fig) → parieren; (Boxing) blowabwehren; ball, shotabwehren
vi (Fencing) → parieren; (Boxing, Ftbl) → abwehren

parry

[ˈpærɪ] vt (blow) → parare (fig) (question) → eludere
References in classic literature ?
And there was an old gentleman who shall be nameless, being too rich a mynheer to be lightly mentioned, who, in the battle of White Plains, being an excellent master of defence, parried a musket-ball with a small-sword, insomuch that he absolutely felt it whiz round the blade, and glance off at the hilt; in proof of which he was ready at any time to show the sword, with the hilt a little bent.
And everybody went on asking that question, but in vain; for the judge only said he knew what he was talking about, and stopped there; Tom said he hadn't any idea what his uncle meant, and Wilson, whenever he was asked what he thought it meant, parried the question by asking the questioner what HE thought it meant.
For it would have been impossible for him to hide from Eppie that she was not his own child: even if the most delicate reticence on the point could have been expected from Raveloe gossips in her presence, her own questions about her mother could not have been parried, as she grew up, without that complete shrouding of the past which would have made a painful barrier between their minds.