parsimony


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Related to parsimony: principle of parsimony, law of parsimony

par·si·mo·ny

 (pär′sə-mō′nē)
n.
1. Unusual or excessive frugality; extreme economy or stinginess.
2. Adoption of the simplest assumption in the formulation of a theory or in the interpretation of data, especially in accordance with the rule of Ockham's razor.

[Middle English parcimony, from Latin parsimōnia, from parsus, past participle of parcere, to spare.]

parsimony

(ˈpɑːsɪmənɪ)
n
(Banking & Finance) extreme care or reluctance in spending; frugality; niggardliness
[C15: from Latin parcimōnia, from parcere to spare]
parsimonious adj
ˌparsiˈmoniously adv

par•si•mo•ny

(ˈpɑr səˌmoʊ ni)

n.
extreme or excessive economy or frugality; stinginess.
[1400–50; parcimony < Latin parsimōnia, parcimōnia=parsi- (comb. form of parsus, past participle of parcere to economize) or parci- (comb. form of parcus sparing) + -mōnia -mony]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.parsimony - extreme care in spending money; reluctance to spend money unnecessarily
frugality, frugalness - prudence in avoiding waste
2.parsimony - extreme stinginessparsimony - extreme stinginess      
stinginess - a lack of generosity; a general unwillingness to part with money
littleness, pettiness, smallness - lack of generosity in trifling matters
miserliness - total lack of generosity with money

parsimony

noun (Formal) meanness, tightness, penny-pinching (informal), frugality, nearness (informal), stinginess, miserliness, niggardliness, minginess (Brit. informal) Due to the parsimony of the local council, only one machine was built.
Translations

parsimony

[ˈpɑːsɪmənɪ] Nparquedad f, excesiva frugalidad f

parsimony

nGeiz m

parsimony

[ˈpɑːsɪmənɪ] nparsimonia
References in classic literature ?
She meant this for a stab at Miss Miranda's parsimony, remembering the four spare chambers, closed from January to December; but Rebecca thought it was intended as a suggestion.
The security of all would thus be subjected to the parsimony, improvidence, or inability of a part.
Parsimony is one of the best, and yet is not innocent; for it withholdeth men from works of liberality and charity.
A little later Norton reminded them of Hamilton's Law of Parsimony, the application of which they immediately claimed for every reasoning process of theirs.
Beginning here, as though regretting her parsimony, Nature had spread his features with a lavish hand.
Even when I took command, she was fit only for the junk pile; but the world-old parsimony of government retained her in active service, and sent two hundred men to sea in her, with myself, a mere boy, in command of her, to patrol thirty from Iceland to the Azores.
Jones was going to rebuke him, but the stranger prevented it by proceeding thus: "I had a chum, a very prudent, frugal young lad, who, though he had no very large allowance, had by his parsimony heaped up upwards of forty guineas, which I knew he kept in his escritore.
Pennies saved one and two at a time by bulldozing the grocer and the vegetable man and the butcher until one's cheeks burned with the silent imputation of parsimony that such close dealing implied.
If mere parsimony could have made a man rich, Sir Pitt Crawley might have become very wealthy--if he had been an attorney in a country town, with no capital but his brains, it is very possible that he would have turned them to good account, and might have achieved for himself a very considerable influence and competency.
What with the patrician requirements of Barnacle junior, the three young ladies, Mrs Tite Barnacle nee Stiltstalking, and himself, Mr Tite Barnacle found the intervals between quarter day and quarter day rather longer than he could have desired; a circumstance which he always attributed to the country's parsimony.
As it was, Mr Barnacle, finding his gentlemanly residence extremely inconvenient and extremely dear, always laid it, as a public servant, at the door of the country, and adduced it as another instance of the country's parsimony.
He had not come to stay with him on his arrival in Petersburg simply from parsimony, though that had been perhaps his chief object.