parson


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Related to parson: Pearson

par·son

 (pär′sən)
n.
1. An Anglican cleric with full legal control of a parish under ecclesiastical law; a rector.
2. A member of the clergy, especially a Protestant minister.

[Middle English, parish priest, from Old French persone, from Medieval Latin persōna, from Latin, character; see person.]

parson

(ˈpɑːsən)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a parish priest in the Church of England, formerly applied only to those who held ecclesiastical benefices
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) any clergyman
3. (Ecclesiastical Terms) NZ a nonconformist minister
[C13: from Medieval Latin persōna parish priest, representative of the parish, from Latin: personage; see person]
parˈsonic, parˈsonical adj

par•son

(ˈpɑr sən)

n.
a member of the clergy, esp. a Protestant minister; pastor; rector.
[1200–50; Middle English persone < Medieval Latin persōna parish priest, Latin: personage. See person]
par′son•ish, par′son•like`, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.parson - a person authorized to conduct religious worshipparson - a person authorized to conduct religious worship; "clergymen are usually called ministers in Protestant churches"
clergyman, man of the cloth, reverend - a member of the clergy and a spiritual leader of the Christian Church
ministrant - someone who serves as a minister

parson

noun clergyman, minister, priest, vicar, divine, incumbent, reverend (informal), preacher, pastor, cleric, rector, curate, churchman, man of God, man of the cloth, ecclesiastic At that time, the parish did not have a resident parson.

parson

noun
A person ordained for service in a Christian church:
Informal: reverend.
Translations
قِسّيسكاهِن ، خوري
duchovnípastor
præstsognepræst
kirkkoherrapappi
prestur
dvasiškisklebonasklebonijakunigas
draudzes mācītājsgarīdznieks, mācītājs

parson

[ˈpɑːsn]
A. Nclérigo m, cura m; (Protestant) → pastor m
B. CPD parson's nose N [of chicken] → rabadilla f

parson

[ˈpɑːrsən] n (= clergyman) → ecclésiastique m; (Church of England)pasteur m

parson

nPfarrer m, → Pastor m, → Pfaffe m (pej); parson’s noseBürzel m, → Sterz m

parson

[ˈpɑːsn] n (gen) → parroco, prete m; (Church of England) → pastore m

parson

(ˈpaːsn) noun
1. the priest, minister etc of a parish, usually of the Church of England.
2. any priest, minister etc.
ˈparsonage (-nidʒ) noun
the house in which the parson of a parish lives.
References in classic literature ?
It was a matter of no little vanity to him on Sundays, to take his station in front of the church gallery, with a band of chosen singers; where, in his own mind, he completely carried away the palm from the parson.
The fact to be in possession of was therefore that his old friend, the youngest of several daughters of a poor country parson, had, at the age of twenty, on taking service for the first time in the schoolroom, come up to London, in trepidation, to answer in person an advertisement that had already placed her in brief correspondence with the advertiser.
And you have once in your life passed a holy church in Cape-Town, where you doubtless overheard a holy parson addressing his hearers as his beloved fellow-creatures, have you, cook
Did you ever see any parson a wearing mourning for the devil?
I says, now I reckon the widow or the parson or somebody prayed that this bread would find me, and here it has gone and done it.
The discourse was resumed presently, but it went lame and halting, all possibility of impressiveness being at an end; for even the gravest sentiments were constantly being received with a smothered burst of unholy mirth, under cover of some remote pew-back, as if the poor parson had said a rarely facetious thing.
Nigger stealing corn from old Parson Silas, I judged.
You have lived the life of a nun: no doubt you are well drilled in religious forms;--Brocklehurst, who I understand directs Lowood, is a parson, is he not?
The little souls were comforting each other with better thoughts than I could have hit on: no parson in the world ever pictured heaven so beautifully as they did, in their innocent talk; and, while I sobbed and listened, I could not help wishing we were all there safe together.
Heaven," he answered, and drove his spade deep into the soil, "'cording to what parson says.
But there might be such a thing as a man's soul being loose from his body, and going out and in, like a bird out of its nest and back; and that was how folks got over-wise, for they went to school in this shell-less state to those who could teach them more than their neighbours could learn with their five senses and the parson.
Squire Jenkins and the Parson say they wouldn't come near your house again--no matter how sick they are.