particulate matter


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particulate matter

n. Abbr. PM
Material suspended in the air in the form of minute solid particles or liquid droplets, especially when considered as an atmospheric pollutant.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.particulate matter - a small discrete mass of solid or liquid matter that remains individually dispersed in gas or liquid emissions (usually considered to be an atmospheric pollutant)
material, stuff - the tangible substance that goes into the makeup of a physical object; "coal is a hard black material"; "wheat is the stuff they use to make bread"
dust - fine powdery material such as dry earth or pollen that can be blown about in the air; "the furniture was covered with dust"
References in periodicals archive ?
There were two years of data for fine particulate matter (P[M.
Researchers also found that ozone will not be affected by an increase in local vehicle emissions, but that particulate matter from construction will likely increase, though they cautioned that the impact would be nominal.
Settling Factors in Particulate Matter Emission Estimates - Published emission factors often do not take into account that, depending on the process and the nature of the PM generated, a significant portion of the generated emissions can "fall out" by gravity.
The findings hit home in Los Angeles, which, along with the Central Valley, has the nation's highest levels of fine particulate matter.
1] was almost five times higher at the highest level of particulate matter exposure than at the lowest level.
Last November, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Carol Browner announced plans to revise the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for two criteria pollutants: particulate matter (PM) and ground-level ozone (O).
Southern California and the San Joaquin Valley both have the highest levels of fine particulate matter.
Short-term effects of ambient sulphur dioxide and particulate matter on mortality in 12 European cities: results from time series data from the APHEA project.
DeFranco and her colleagues examined fine particulate matter, which is a significant health hazard because these tiny particles can deposit deep into the lower airways and air sacs within the lungs and enter the circulatory system.

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