partridgeberry

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Related to partridgeberries: lowbush cranberry

par·tridge·ber·ry

 (pär′trĭj-bĕr′ē)
n.
A creeping evergreen perennial plant (Mitchella repens) of eastern North America, having small white paired flowers and scarlet berries. Also called twinberry.

partridgeberry

(ˈpɑːtrɪdʒˌbɛrɪ)
n, pl -ries
1. (Plants) Also called: boxberry or twinberry a creeping woody rubiaceous plant, Mitchella repens, of E North America with small white fragrant flowers and scarlet berries
2. (Cookery) the berry of the wintergreen
3. (Plants) another name for wintergreen1

par•tridge•ber•ry

(ˈpɑr trɪdʒˌbɛr i)

n., pl. -ries.
a North American trailing plant, Mitchella repens, of the madder family, having roundish evergreen leaves, fragrant white flowers, and red berries.
[1705–15]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.partridgeberry - creeping woody plant of eastern North America with shiny evergreen leaves and scarlet berriespartridgeberry - creeping woody plant of eastern North America with shiny evergreen leaves and scarlet berries
genus Mitchella, Mitchella - creeping evergreen herbs of North America
vine - a plant with a weak stem that derives support from climbing, twining, or creeping along a surface
References in periodicals archive ?
Blueberries and partridgeberries are featured in desserts, such as the partridgeberry upside-down cake and lemon torte with blueberry sauce at Java Jack's Restaurant in Rocky Harbour.
From partridgeberries in Newfoundland to soapberries in the Yukon, there are many treasured (and often jealously guarded) berry patches across Canada.
Coltsfoot leaves and flowers proved disappointing, as did hawthorn haws and partridgeberries.
Not only are edible berries fundamentally healthful, but even hitherto unknown (to visitors) varieties, such as partridgeberries and bakeapples, come in familiar shapes, sizes and colours.
In the third section, one woman combs out sheep's wool, spinning it with a drop spindle and dying it with local fruit, such as partridgeberries.
The strawberries begin around the end of June, followed by skunk currants, raspberries, bakeapples (cloud-berries), blueberries, squashberries, partridgeberries (foxberries or lingonberries), blackberries, and finally marsh berries and cranberries in October.