pass off


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pass

 (păs)
v. passed, pass·ing, pass·es
v.intr.
1. To move on or ahead; proceed: The train passed through fields of wheat.
2. To extend; run: The river passes through our land.
3.
a. To move by or in front of something: The band passed and the crowd cheered.
b. To move past another vehicle: The sports car passed on the right.
4. To gain passage despite obstacles: pass through difficult years.
5. To move past in time; elapse: The days passed quickly.
6.
a. To be transferred from one to another; circulate: The wine passed around the table.
b. Sports To transfer a ball or puck to a teammate.
7. To be communicated or exchanged between persons: Loud words passed in the corridor.
8. To be transferred or conveyed to another by will or deed: The title passed to the older heir.
9. To undergo transition from one condition, form, quality, or characteristic to another: Daylight passed into darkness.
10. To come to an end: My anger suddenly passed. The headache finally passed.
11. To cease to exist; die. Often used with on: The patient passed on during the night.
12. To happen; take place: wanted to know what had passed at the meeting.
13.
a. To be allowed to happen without notice or challenge: Let their rude remarks pass.
b. Sports & Games To decline one's turn to bid, draw, bet, compete, or play.
c. To decline an offer: When we offered him dessert, he passed.
14. To undergo an examination or a trial with favorable results.
15.
a. To serve as a barely acceptable substitute: The spare tire was nearly bald but would pass until we bought a new one.
b. To be accepted as a member of a group by denying one's own ancestry or background.
16. To be approved or adopted: The motion to adjourn passed.
17. Law
a. To make a decision: to pass upon a legal question.
b. To convey property to an heir or heirs: to pass according to the terms of the will.
18. Medicine To be discharged from a bodily part: The patient had a lot of pain when the kidney stone passed.
19. Sports To thrust or lunge in fencing.
v.tr.
1.
a. To go by without stopping; proceed beyond or leave behind: The bus passed a gas station.
b. To go across; go through: We passed the border into Mexico.
2. To allow to go by or elapse; spend: He passed his winter in Vermont.
3.
a. To go by without paying attention to; disregard or ignore: If you pass the new photographs in the collection, you'll miss some outstanding ones.
b. To fail to pay (a dividend).
4. To go beyond; surpass: The inheritance passed my wildest dreams.
5.
a. To undergo (a trial or examination) with favorable results: She passed every test.
b. To cause or allow to go through a trial, test, or examination successfully: The instructor passed all the candidates.
6.
a. To cause to move: We passed our hands over the fabric.
b. To cause to move into a certain position: pass a ribbon around a package.
c. To cause to move as part of a process: pass liquid through a filter.
d. To cause to go by: The sergeant passed his troops before the grandstand.
e. To allow to cross a barrier: The border guard passed the tourists.
f. Baseball To walk (a batter).
g. To maneuver (the bull) by means of a pase in bullfighting.
7.
a. To cause to be transferred from one to another; circulate: They passed the news quickly.
b. To hand over to someone else: Please pass the bread.
c. Sports To transfer (a ball, for example) to a teammate, as by throwing.
d. To cause to be accepted; circulate fraudulently: pass counterfeit money.
e. Law To convey (property) to an heir or heirs: to pass an estate.
8. Medicine To discharge (a waste product, for example) from a bodily part.
9. Medicine To introduce (an instrument) into a bodily cavity.
10.
a. To approve; adopt: The legislature passed the bill.
b. To be sanctioned, ratified, or approved by: The bill passed the House of Representatives.
11. To pronounce; utter: pass judgment; pass sentence on an offender.
n.
1. The act of passing; passage.
2. A way, such as a narrow gap between mountains, that affords passage around, over, or through a barrier.
3.
a. A permit, ticket, or authorization to come and go at will.
b. A free ticket entitling one to transportation or admission.
c. Written leave of absence from military duty.
d. A passing grade, especially when graded using a pass-fail grading system.
4.
a. A sweep or run, as by an aircraft, over or toward an area or target.
b. A single complete cycle of operations, as by a machine or computer program.
5. A condition or situation, often critical in nature; a predicament: contract negotiations that had come to an emotional pass.
6. A sexual invitation or overture: Was he making a pass at her?
7. A motion of the hand or the waving of a wand: The magician made a pass over the hat.
8.
a. Sports A transfer of a ball or puck between teammates.
b. Sports A lunge or thrust in fencing.
c. Baseball A base on balls.
9. Sports & Games A refusal to bid, draw, bet, compete, or play.
10. Games A winning throw of the dice in craps.
11. A pase in bullfighting.
Phrasal Verbs:
pass away
1. To pass out of existence; end.
2. To die.
pass for
To be accepted as or believed to be: You could pass for a teenager. The fake painting passed for an original.
pass off
1. To offer, sell, or put into circulation (an imitation) as genuine: pass off glass as a gemstone.
2. To present (one's self) as other than what one is: tried to pass himself off as a banker.
pass out
To lose consciousness.
pass over
To leave out; disregard.
pass up Informal
To let go by; reject: pass up a chance for promotion; an opportunity too good to pass up.
Idioms:
bring to pass
To cause to happen.
come to pass
To occur.
pass muster
To pass an examination or inspection; measure up to a given standard.
pass (one's) lips
1. To be eaten or drunk.
2. To issue or be spoken: Rumors never passed her lips.
pass the hat
To take up a collection of money.
pass the time of day
To exchange greetings or engage in pleasantries.
pass the torch
To relinquish (responsibilities, for example) to another or others.

[Middle English passen, from Old French passer, from Vulgar Latin passāre, from Latin passus, step; see pace1.]

pass′er n.
Usage Note: The past tense and past participle of pass is passed: They passed (or have passed) our home. Time had passed slowly. Past is the corresponding adjective (in centuries past), adverb (drove past), preposition (past midnight), and noun (lived in the past).

pass off

vb (adverb)
1. to be or cause to be accepted or circulated in a false character or identity: he passed the fake diamonds off as real.
2. (intr) to come to a gradual end; disappear: eventually the pain passed off.
3. (Chemistry) to emit (a substance) as a gas or vapour, or (of a substance) to be emitted in this way
4. (intr) to take place: the meeting passed off without disturbance.
5. (tr) to set aside or disregard: I managed to pass off his insult.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.pass off - be accepted as something or somebody in a false character or identity; "She passed off as a Russian agent"
appear, seem, look - give a certain impression or have a certain outward aspect; "She seems to be sleeping"; "This appears to be a very difficult problem"; "This project looks fishy"; "They appeared like people who had not eaten or slept for a long time"
2.pass off - disregard; "She passed off the insult"
brush aside, brush off, discount, dismiss, disregard, ignore, push aside - bar from attention or consideration; "She dismissed his advances"
3.pass off - cause to be circulated and accepted in a false character or identity; "She passed the glass off as diamonds"; "He passed himself off as a secret agent"
make pass, pass - cause to pass; "She passed around the plates"
4.pass off - disappear gradually; "The pain eventually passed off"
disappear, vanish, go away - get lost, as without warning or explanation; "He disappeared without a trace"
5.pass off - come to pass; "What is happening?"; "The meeting took place off without an incidence"; "Nothing occurred that seemed important"
recrudesce, develop, break - happen; "Report the news as it develops"; "These political movements recrudesce from time to time"
come up, arise - result or issue; "A slight unpleasantness arose from this discussion"
result - come about or follow as a consequence; "nothing will result from this meeting"
intervene - occur between other event or between certain points of time; "the war intervened between the birth of her two children"
transpire - come about, happen, or occur; "Several important events transpired last week"
give - occur; "what gives?"
operate - happen; "What is going on in the minds of the people?"
supervene - take place as an additional or unexpected development
proceed, go - follow a certain course; "The inauguration went well"; "how did your interview go?"
come - come to pass; arrive, as in due course; "The first success came three days later"; "It came as a shock"; "Dawn comes early in June"
fall - occur at a specified time or place; "Christmas falls on a Monday this year"; "The accent falls on the first syllable"
anticipate - be a forerunner of or occur earlier than; "This composition anticipates Impressionism"
develop - be gradually disclosed or unfolded; become manifest; "The plot developed slowly";
recur, repeat - happen or occur again; "This is a recurring story"
come off, go over, go off - happen in a particular manner; "how did your talk go over?"
roll around, come around - happen regularly; "Christmas rolled around again"
materialise, materialize, happen - come into being; become reality; "Her dream really materialized"
bechance, befall, happen - happen, occur, or be the case in the course of events or by chance; "It happens that today is my birthday"; "These things befell" (Santayana)
bechance, befall, betide - become of; happen to; "He promised that no harm would befall her"; "What has become of my children?"
coincide, concur - happen simultaneously; "The two events coincided"
backfire, backlash, recoil - come back to the originator of an action with an undesired effect; "Your comments may backfire and cause you a lot of trouble"
chance - be the case by chance; "I chanced to meet my old friend in the street"
break - happen or take place; "Things have been breaking pretty well for us in the past few months"
fall, shine, strike - touch or seem as if touching visually or audibly; "Light fell on her face"; "The sun shone on the fields"; "The light struck the golden necklace"; "A strange sound struck my ears"
turn out - prove to be in the result or end; "It turns out that he was right"
contemporise, contemporize, synchronise, synchronize - happen at the same time
6.pass off - expel (gases or odors)
belch, burp, eruct, bubble - expel gas from the stomach; "In China it is polite to burp at the table"
force out - emit or cause to move with force of effort; "force out the air"; "force out the splinter"
give forth, emanate, exhale - give out (breath or an odor); "The chimney exhales a thick smoke"
eject, expel, release, exhaust, discharge - eliminate (a substance); "combustion products are exhausted in the engine"; "the plant releases a gas"
radiate - send out real or metaphoric rays; "She radiates happiness"
bubble - form, produce, or emit bubbles; "The soup was bubbling"

pass

verb
1. To move along a particular course:
2. To make or go on a journey:
Idiom: hit the road.
3. To catch up with and move past:
4. To be greater or better than:
Informal: beat.
5. To go across:
6. To move past in time:
elapse, go (by), lapse.
7. To cause to be transferred from one to another:
convey, hand (over), transmit.
9. To cause (a disease) to pass to another or others:
10. To come as by lot or inheritance:
11. To convey (something) from one generation to the next.Along or on:
12. To move toward a termination:
13. To cease living.Also used with on:
Informal: pop off.
Idioms: bite the dust, breathe one's last, cash in, give up the ghost, go to one's grave, kick the bucket, meet one's end, pass on to the Great Beyond, turn up one's toes.
15. To use time in a particular way:
16. To go through (life) in a certain way:
17. To represent oneself in a given character or as other than what one is:
Idiom: pass oneself off as.
18. To be accepted or approved:
19. To accept officially:
phrasal verb
pass away
1. To move toward a termination:
2. To cease living:
Informal: pop off.
Idioms: bite the dust, breathe one's last, cash in, give up the ghost, go to one's grave, kick the bucket, meet one's end, pass on to the Great Beyond, turn up one's toes.
phrasal verb
pass off
To offer or put into circulation (an inferior or spurious item):
phrasal verb
pass out
To suffer temporary lack of consciousness:
phrasal verb
pass over
To pretend not to see:
noun
1. A free ticket entitling one to transportation or admission:
Informal: comp.
Slang: freebie.
2. A decisive point:
Translations
يَمُرُّ، يَزول
přejít
aftage
líîa hjá

w>pass off

vi
(= take place)ablaufen, vonstattengehen
(= end)vorüber- or vorbeigehen
(= be taken as)durchgehen (as als); she could pass off as an Italiansie würde als Italienerin durchgehen
vt sep to pass oneself/somebody/something off as somethingsich/jdn/etw als or für etw ausgeben

pass

(paːs) verb
1. to move towards and then beyond (something, by going past, through, by, over etc). I pass the shops on my way to work; The procession passed along the corridor.
2. to move, give etc from one person, state etc to another. They passed the photographs around; The tradition is passed (on/down) from father to son.
3. to go or be beyond. This passes my understanding.
4. (of vehicles etc on a road) to overtake. The sports car passed me at a dangerous bend in the road.
5. to spend (time). They passed several weeks in the country.
6. (of an official group, government etc) to accept or approve. The government has passed a resolution.
7. to give or announce (a judgement or sentence). The magistrate passed judgement on the prisoner.
8. to end or go away. His sickness soon passed.
9. to (judge to) be successful in (an examination etc). I passed my driving test.
noun
1. a narrow path between mountains. a mountain pass.
2. a ticket or card allowing a person to do something, eg to travel free or to get in to a building. You must show your pass before entering.
3. a successful result in an examination, especially when below a distinction, honours etc. There were ten passes and no fails.
4. (in ball games) a throw, kick, hit etc of the ball from one player to another. The centre-forward made a pass towards the goal.
ˈpassable adjective
1. fairly good. a passable tennis player.
2. (of a river, road etc) able to be passed, travelled over etc. The mud has made the roads no longer passable.
ˈpassing adjective
1. going past. a passing car.
2. lasting only a short time. a passing interest.
3. (of something said) casual and not made as part of a serious talk about the subject. a passing reference.
ˌpasser-ˈbyplural ˌpassers-ˈby noun
a person who is going past a place when something happens. He asked the passers-by if they had seen the accident.
ˈpassword noun
a secret word by which those who know it can recognize each other and be allowed to go past, enter etc. He was not allowed into the army camp because he did not know the password.
in passing
while doing or talking about something else; without explaining fully what one means. He told her the story, and said in passing that he did not completely believe it.
let (something) pass
to ignore something rather than take the trouble to argue. I'll let that pass.
pass as/for
to be mistaken for or accepted as. Some man-made materials could pass as silk; His nasty remarks pass for wit among his admirers.
pass away
to die. Her grandmother passed away last night.
pass the buck
to give the responsibility or blame for something to someone else. She always passes the buck if she is asked to do anything.
pass by
to go past (a particular place). I was passing by when the bride arrived at the church; She passed by the hospital on the way to the library.
pass off
(of sickness, an emotion etc) to go away. By the evening, his sickness had passed off and he felt better.
pass (something or someone) off as
to pretend that (something or someone) is (something or someone else). He passed himself off as a journalist.
pass on
1. to give to someone else (usually something which one has been given by a third person). I passed on his message.
2. to die. His mother passed on yesterday.
pass out
1. to faint. I feel as though I'm going to pass out.
2. to give to several different people. The teacher passed out books to her class.
pass over
to ignore or overlook. They passed him over for promotion.
pass up
not to accept (a chance, opportunity etc). He passed up the offer of a good job.

passed is the past tense of to pass: He passed the scene of the accident .
past means up to and beyond: She walked past the shops .
References in classic literature ?
I could but vaguely conjecture the cause of my paralysis, and my only hope lay in that it might pass off as suddenly as it had fallen upon me.
But this sort of sickness used to pass off with the first sight of a familiar landmark.
A TEENAGER bit a bus driver when he took his bus pass off him, a court heard.
Allcopy has also agreed that it will not in the future infringe Canon s trade mark and copyright in issue in the dispute or pass off themselves or their products as being associated with Canon, including in relation to the toner bottle products referred to above and, in addition, ACP-IRC2880-Magenta, ACP-IRC2880-Black, ACP-IRC2880-Cyan and ACP-IRC2880-Yellow.
Basically no-one may pass off his/her goods as those of another.
There were nurses who attached saline drips on protesters so they could pass off as patients.
The authorities had hoped that the Eid prayers would pass off peacefully after the lifting of curfew the day before.
I'm sure many bar owners have been tempted to pass off cheaper products as premium brands to reduce their costs, but no one is ordering the other products by name.
ONE in three dinner party hosts in Coventry cheat and pass off pre-cooked meals or ready-to-use sauces as their own handiwork, a survey shows.
He started the night with a high-flying two-handed dunk off an alley-oop pass off the side of the backboard from teammate Paul Pierce.