passé

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pas·sé

 (pă-sā′)
adj.
1. No longer current or in fashion; out-of-date.
2. Past the prime; faded or aged.

[French, past participle of passer, to pass, from Old French; see pass.]

passé

(ˈpɑːseɪ; ˈpɑseɪ; French pɑse)
adj
1. out-of-date: passé ideas.
2. past the prime; faded: a passé society beauty. Also (fem): passée
[C18: from French, past participle of passer to pass]

pas•sé

(pæˈseɪ)

adj.
1. old-fashioned; out-of-date; outmoded.
2. past one's prime.
[1765–75; < French, past participle of passer to pass]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.passe - out of fashionpasse - out of fashion; "a suit of rather antique appearance"; "demode (or outmoded) attire"; "outmoded ideas"
unfashionable, unstylish - not in accord with or not following current fashion; "unfashionable clothes"; "melodrama of a now unfashionable kind"

passé

adjective out-of-date, old-fashioned, dated, outdated, obsolete, unfashionable, antiquated, outmoded, old hat, outworn, unhip (slang), démodé (French) Punk rock is passé now.

passé

adjective
Translations

passé

[ˈpæseɪ] ADJpasado de moda

passé

[ˈpɑːseɪ] adj (= old hat) → dépassé(e)

passé

adjüberholt, passé (inf)

passé

[ˈpæseɪ] adjsorpassato/a, fuori moda
References in classic literature ?
Vous qui pleurez un passe plein de charmes, Et qui trainez des jours infortunes, Tous vos malheurs se verront termines, Quand a Dieu seul vous offrirez vos larmes, Vous qui pleurez
Upon this I set myself to explain the meaning of all the combinations--of "rouge et noir," of "pair et impair," of "manque et passe," with, lastly, the different values in the system of numbers.
He accounts for it by his handsome face and thinks Miss Miller a young lady qui se passe ses fantaisies
As it passes through the remaining vertebrae the canal tapers in size, but for a considerable distance remains of large capacity.
Then he began to mutter and make passes in the air with his hands.
Travelling hard all night, we found ourselves next morning past the plain; but the road we were in was not more commodious, the points of the rocks pierced our feet; to increase our perplexities we were alarmed with the approach of an armed troop, which our fear immediately suggested to be the Galles, who chiefly beset these passes of the mountains; we put ourselves on the defensive, and expected them, whom, upon a more exact examination, we found to be only a caravan of merchants come as usual to fetch salt.
When a knight is involved in some difficulty from which he cannot be delivered save by the hand of another knight, though they may be at a distance of two or three thousand leagues or more one from the other, they either take him up on a cloud, or they provide a bark for him to get into, and in less than the twinkling of an eye they carry him where they will and where his help is required; and so, Sancho, this bark is placed here for the same purpose; this is as true as that it is now day, and ere this one passes tie Dapple and Rocinante together, and then in God's hand be it to guide us; for I would not hold back from embarking, though barefooted friars were to beg me.
Besides, I wish such persons to observe that the grand artery and the arterial vein are of much harder and firmer texture than the venous artery and the hollow vein; and that the two last expand before entering the heart, and there form, as it were, two pouches denominated the auricles of the heart, which are composed of a substance similar to that of the heart itself; and that there is always more warmth in the heart than in any other part of the body- and finally, that this heat is capable of causing any drop of blood that passes into the cavities rapidly to expand and dilate, just as all liquors do when allowed to fall drop by drop into a highly heated vessel.
On leaving Omaha, it passes along the left bank of the Platte River as far as the junction of its northern branch, follows its southern branch, crosses the Laramie territory and the Wahsatch Mountains, turns the Great Salt Lake, and reaches Salt Lake City, the Mormon capital, plunges into the Tuilla Valley, across the American Desert, Cedar and Humboldt Mountains, the Sierra Nevada, and descends, via Sacramento, to the Pacific--its grade, even on the Rocky Mountains, never exceeding one hundred and twelve feet to the mile.
But in the Epic poem the absurdity passes unnoticed.
It passes before my eyes in detail, it glimmers at me as out of a mist; and as it does so, well-known faces appear, which seem actually to be present with me in this room
Their passes and defiles present the wildest scenery, partaking of the sublime rather than the beautiful, and abounding with frightful precipices.