passion


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pas·sion

 (păsh′ən)
n.
1.
a. Strong or powerful emotion: a crime of passion.
b. A powerful emotion, such as anger or joy: a spirit governed by intense passions.
2.
a. A state of strong sexual desire or love: "His desire flared into a passion he could no longer check" (Barbara Taylor Bradford).
b. The object of such desire or love: She became his passion.
3.
a. Boundless enthusiasm: His skills as a player don't quite match his passion for the game.
b. The object of such enthusiasm: Soccer is her passion.
4. An abandoned display of emotion, especially of anger: He's been known to fly into a passion without warning.
5. Passion
a. The sufferings of Jesus in the period following the Last Supper and including the Crucifixion, as related in the New Testament.
b. A narrative, musical setting, or pictorial representation of Jesus's sufferings.
6. Martyrdom: the passion of Saint Margaret.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Medieval Latin passiō, passiōn-, sufferings of Jesus or a martyr, from Late Latin, physical suffering, martyrdom, sinful desire, from Latin, an undergoing, from passus, past participle of patī, to suffer; see pē(i)- in Indo-European roots.]
Synonyms: passion, fervor, fire, zeal, ardor
These nouns denote powerful, intense emotion. Passion is a deep, overwhelming emotion: "There is not a passion so strongly rooted in the human heart as envy" (Richard Brinsley Sheridan).
The term may signify sexual desire or anger: "He flew into a violent passion and abused me mercilessly" (H.G. Wells).
Fervor is great warmth and intensity of feeling: "The union of the mathematician with the poet, fervor with measure, passion with correctness, this surely is the ideal" (William James).
Fire is burning passion: "In our youth our hearts were touched with fire" (Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.)
Zeal is strong, enthusiastic devotion to a cause, ideal, or goal and tireless diligence in its furtherance: "Laurie [resolved], with a glow of philanthropic zeal, to found and endow an institution for ... women with artistic tendencies" (Louisa May Alcott).
Ardor is fiery intensity of feeling: "When ... Moby Dick was fairly sighted from the mast-heads, Macey, the chief mate, burned with ardor to encounter him" (Herman Melville).

passion

(ˈpæʃən)
n
1. ardent love or affection
2. intense sexual love
3. a strong affection or enthusiasm for an object, concept, etc: a passion for poetry.
4. any strongly felt emotion, such as love, hate, envy, etc
5. a state or outburst of extreme anger: he flew into a passion.
6. the object of an intense desire, ardent affection, or enthusiasm
7. an outburst expressing intense emotion: he burst into a passion of sobs.
8. (Philosophy) philosophy
a. any state of the mind in which it is affected by something external, such as perception, desire, etc, as contrasted with action
b. feelings, desires or emotions, as contrasted with reason. Also called: the passions
9. (Theology) the sufferings and death of a Christian martyr
[C12: via French from Church Latin passiō suffering, from Latin patī to suffer]

Passion

(ˈpæʃən)
n
1. (Theology) the sufferings of Christ from the Last Supper to his death on the cross
2. (Theology) any of the four Gospel accounts of this
3. (Music, other) a musical setting of this: the St Matthew Passion.
4. (Theology) a musical setting of this: the St Matthew Passion.

pas•sion

(ˈpæʃ ən)

n.
1. compelling emotion.
2. strong amorous feeling; love.
3. strong sexual desire; lust.
4. a strong fondness, enthusiasm, or desire for something: a passion for music.
5. the object of one's passion.
6. an outburst of emotion.
7. violent anger; wrath; rage.
8. (often cap.)
a. the sufferings of Christ on the cross or subsequent to the Last Supper.
b. the Gospel narrative of Christ's sufferings or a musical setting of this.
[1125–75; Middle English (< Old French) < Late Latin passiō Christ's sufferings on the cross, endurance, illness = Latin pat(ī) to suffer, submit + -tiō -tion]
pas′sion•ful, adj.
syn: See feeling.

passion

  • acokoinonia - Sex without passion or desire.
  • excandescence - The state of being glowing hot, anger or passion.
  • incense - Once meant to kindle any passion, good or bad.
  • wrangle - To wrangle can mean "to scream with passion."

Passion

 

See Also: DESIRE, LOVE, SEX

  1. As passionate as shredded wheat —Lawrence Gilman
  2. The echoes of passion in the emptiness of a lonely heart is like the murmurings of wind and water in the silence of the wilderness —Francois Rene de Chateaubriand
  3. Genuine passion is like a mountain stream; it admits of no impediment; it cannot go backward; it must go forward —Christian Nestell Bovee
  4. Hot as a forty-balled tomcat —Rita Mae Brown
  5. Instant passion is like instant coffee; it’s cheap and it’s quick and it makes you wish you had a percolator —Carla Lane, dialogue for heroine of English television sit-com “Solo,” broadcast April 7, 1987
  6. Our passions are in truth, like the phoenix. The old one burns away, the new one rises out of its ashes at once —Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
  7. Our passions are like convulsion fits, which, though they make us stronger for the time, leave us the weaker ever after —Jonathan Swift
  8. Our world passions are like so many lawyers wrangling and brawling at a bar —Owen Feltham

    The comparison continues as follows: “Discretion is the lord-keeper of man that sits as judge, and moderation their contestations.”

  9. The passionate are like men standing on their heads; they see all things the wrong way —Plato
  10. Passionate men, like fleet hounds, are apt to over-run the scent —H. G. Bohn’s Handbook of Proverbs
  11. Passion burned through her like a sunrise —Ellen Glasgow
  12. Passion is like crime; it does not thrive on the established order —Thomas Mann
  13. Passion is like genius: a miracle —Romain Rolland
  14. Passionless as a clam —Gertrude Atherton
  15. Passion … like a fire on the prairie that devours everything around it —W. Somerset Maugham
  16. Passion … like other violent excitements … throws up not only what is best, but what is worst and smallest, in men’s characters —Robert Louis Stevenson
  17. Passions and desires, like the two twists of a rope, mutually mix one with the other, and twine inextricably round the heart —Richard E. Burton
  18. Passions are like fire and water, good servants but bad masters —Alexander Pope
  19. Passions are like fire, useful in a thousand ways and dangerous only in one, through their excess —Francois due de La Rochefoucauld
  20. Passions are like the trout in a pond: one devours the others until only one fat old trout is left —Otto von Bismarck
  21. A passion that had moved into his body, like a stranger —Arthur Miller
  22. Passion … went over him like an ocean wave —Jean Stafford

    At another point in her novel, The Mountain Lion, Stafford used the ocean waves comparison to describe the powerful smell of flowers.

ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.passion - a strong feeling or emotionpassion - a strong feeling or emotion    
feeling - the experiencing of affective and emotional states; "she had a feeling of euphoria"; "he had terrible feelings of guilt"; "I disliked him and the feeling was mutual"
infatuation - a foolish and usually extravagant passion or love or admiration
wildness, abandon - a feeling of extreme emotional intensity; "the wildness of his anger"
fervency, fervidness, fervor, fervour, ardor, ardour, fire - feelings of great warmth and intensity; "he spoke with great ardor"
storminess - violent passion in speech or action; "frightened by the storminess of their argument"
2.passion - the trait of being intensely emotionalpassion - the trait of being intensely emotional
emotionalism, emotionality - emotional nature or quality
fieriness - a passionate and quick-tempered nature
3.passion - something that is desired intensely; "his rage for fame destroyed him"
desire - something that is desired
4.passion - an irrational but irresistible motive for a belief or action
irrational motive - a motivation that is inconsistent with reason or logic
agromania - an intense desire to be alone or out in the open
dipsomania, potomania, alcoholism - an intense persistent desire to drink alcoholic beverages to excess
egomania - an intense and irresistible love for yourself and concern for your own needs
kleptomania - an irresistible impulse to steal in the absence of any economic motive
logomania, logorrhea - pathologically excessive (and often incoherent) talking
monomania, possession - a mania restricted to one thing or idea
necromania, necrophilia, necrophilism - an irresistible sexual attraction to dead bodies
phaneromania - an irresistible desire to pick at superficial body parts (as in obsessive nail-biting)
pyromania - an uncontrollable desire to set fire to things
trichotillomania - an irresistible urge to pull out your own hair
5.passion - a feeling of strong sexual desire
concupiscence, physical attraction, sexual desire, eros - a desire for sexual intimacy
6.passion - any object of warm affection or devotion; "the theater was her first love"; "he has a passion for cock fighting";
object - the focus of cognitions or feelings; "objects of thought"; "the object of my affection"
7.Passion - the suffering of Jesus at the Crucifixion
excruciation, suffering, agony - a state of acute pain

passion

noun
3. mania, fancy, enthusiasm, obsession, bug (informal), craving, fascination, craze, infatuation She has a passion for gardening. Television is his passion.
4. rage, fit, storm, anger, fury, resentment, outburst, frenzy, wrath, indignation, flare-up (informal), ire, vehemence, paroxysm Sam flew into a passion at the suggestion. He killed the woman in a fit of passion.
Quotations
"In passion, the body and the spirit seek expression outside of self" [John Boorman journal entry]
"A man who has not passed through the inferno of his passions has never overcome them" [Carl Gustav Jung Memories, Dreams, and Reflections]

passion

noun
1. Powerful, intense emotion:
2. The passionate affection and desire felt by lovers for each other:
4. A strong, enthusiastic liking for something:
5. Passionate devotion to or interest in a cause or subject, for example:
6. A subject or activity that inspires lively interest:
7. An angry outburst:
Translations
عاطِفَه، هَوى ، إنْفِعالعِشْقٌ
vášeňpašije
lidenskabpassion
intohimokärsimyskärsimysnäytelmäkiihkopalo
strast
ástríîa
熱情
열정
aizrautībakaislemilzīga vēlme
vášeň
strast
passion
อารมณ์อันเร่าร้อน
sự đam mê

passion

[ˈpæʃən]
A. N
1. (= love) (sexual, fig) → pasión f
his passion for accuracysu pasión por la exactitud
I have a passion for shellfishel marisco me apasiona
see also crime B
2. (= fervour, emotion) → pasión f
he spoke with great passionhabló con gran pasión
political passions are running highlas pasiones políticas están caldeadas
she has taken to golf with a passionha empezado a jugar al golf y le apasiona
3. (= anger) → cólera f, pasión f
to be in a passionestar encolerizado
to do sth in a fit of passionhacer algo en un arrebato or un arranque de cólera or pasión
to fly into a passionmontar en cólera, encolerizarse
4. (Rel) the Passionla Pasión
the St John/St Matthew Passionla Pasión según San Juan/San Mateo
B. CPD passion fruit Ngranadilla f
Passion play Nmisterio m
Passion Sunday NDomingo m de Pasión

passion

[ˈpæʃən] n
(for person)passion f
a passion for sb → une passion pour qn
I had felt such extraordinary passion for this girl → J'avais éprouvé une passion si intense pour cette fille.
my passion for him → la passion que j'éprouve pour lui
(= feeling) to speak with passion → parler avec passion
(= interest) → passion f
to have a passion for sth → avoir la passion de qch
to have a passion for doing sth → adorer faire qch

passion

n
Leidenschaft f; (= fervour)Leidenschaftlichkeit f; (= enthusiasm)Begeisterung f, → Leidenschaft f; to have a passion for somethingeine Passion or Leidenschaft für etw haben; her passion for oysters/all things Greekihre Passion or ausgeprägte Vorliebe für Austern/alles Griechische; passions were running highdie Erregung schlug hohe Wellen; his passion for the causesein leidenschaftliches Engagement für die Sache; music is a passion with himdie Musik ist bei ihm eine Leidenschaft; his passion is MozartMozart ist seine Passion; to be in a passionerregt sein; to fly into a passionin Erregung geraten, sich erregen
(Rel, Art, Mus) → Passion f; St Matthew PassionMatthäuspassion f

passion

:
passionflower
nPassionsblume f; (hum inf, as address) → Schatz m, → Schätzchen nt
passion fruit
passionless
Passion play
nPassionsspiel nt
Passion Sunday
n(erster) Passionssonntag; (in Protestant church) → Sonntag mJudika
Passion Week
nKarwoche f

passion

[ˈpæʃn] n
a.passione f
to have a passion for sth → aver la passione di qc, avere una passione per qc
his passion for seafood → la sua passione per i frutti di mare
his passion for accuracy → il suo amore per la precisione
to get into a passion (about sth) → andare su tutte le furie (per qc)
b. (Rel) the Passionla Passione

passion

(ˈpӕʃən) noun
very strong feeling, especially of anger or love. He argued with great passion; He has a passion for chocolate.
ˈpassionate (-nət) adjective
having very strong feelings; intense or emotional. a passionate woman; passionate hatred.

passion

عِشْقٌ vášeň lidenskab Leidenschaft πάθος pasión intohimo passion strast passione 熱情 열정 passie lidenskap pasja paixão страсть passion อารมณ์อันเร่าร้อน tutku sự đam mê 热情

pas·sion

n. pasión, emoción intensa.
References in classic literature ?
Amy got no farther, for Jo's hot temper mastered her, and she shook Amy till her teeth chattered in her head, crying in a passion of grief and anger.
There was the truth of virginity and the truth of passion, the truth of wealth and of poverty, of thrift and of profligacy, of carelessness and abandon.
He loves with a personal passion the great country through which his railway runs and branches.
But for that matter, the Creole husband is never jealous; with him the gangrene passion is one which has become dwarfed by disuse.
While the others were busily occupied in seeking to gratify their childish passion for finery, by plundering even the miserable effects of the scout, or had been searching with such bloodthirsty vengeance in their looks for their absent owner, Le Renard had stood at a little distance from the prisoners, with a demeanor so quiet and satisfied, as to betray that he had already effected the grand purpose of his treachery.
It was my happiness to be destitute of this afflicting passion, with which I had the greatest reason to be affected.
And really, looking at him now, he was not so VERY YOUNG for Jessie; whether his unfortunate passion had brought out all his latent manliness, or whether he had hitherto kept his serious nature in the background, certainly he was not a boy.
Let us pardon her one other pause; for it is given to the sole sentiment, or, we might better say, --heightened and rendered intense, as it has been, by sorrow and seclusion,--to the strong passion of her life.
The original papers, together with the scarlet letter itself -- a most curious relic -- are still in my possession, and shall be freely exhibited to whomsoever, induced by the great interest of the narrative, may desire a sight of them I must not be understood affirming that, in the dressing up of the tale, and imagining the motives and modes of passion that influenced the characters who figure in it, I have invariably confined myself within the limits of the old Surveyor's half-a-dozen sheets of foolscap.
For however eagerly and impetuously the savage crew had hailed the announcement of his quest; yet all sailors of all sorts are more or less capricious and unreliable --they live in the varying outer weather, and they inhale its fickleness --and when retained for any object remote and blank in the pursuit, however promissory of life and passion in the end, it is above all things requisite that temporary interests and employment should intervene and hold them healthily suspended for the final dash.
You are unjust, Lady Rowena,'' said the knight, biting his lips in some confusion, and speaking in a tone more natural to him than that of affected gallantry, which he had at first adopted; ``yourself free from passion, you can allow no excuse for the frenzy of another, although caused by your own beauty.
She was usually in love with somebody, and, as her passion was never returned, she had kept all her illusions.