passive


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Related to passive: passive voice, Passive verb, passive exercise, Passive income, Passive aggressive

pas·sive

 (păs′ĭv)
adj.
1. Receiving or subjected to an action without responding or initiating an action in return: the mind viewed as a passive receptacle for sensory experience.
2. Accepting or submitting without objection or resistance; submissive: a passive acceptance of one's fate.
3. Existing, conducted, or experienced without active or concerted effort: "Although tick paralysis is a reportable disease in Washington, surveillance is passive, and only 10 cases were reported during 1987-1995" (US Department of Health and Human Services). "[Many parents believe] that computers are educational and, at the least, less passive than television" (Laurie Hays).
4. Of, relating to, or being certain bonds or shares that do not bear financial interest.
5. Of, relating to, or being a solar heating or cooling system that uses no external mechanical power.
6. Grammar Of, relating to, or being a verb form or voice used to indicate that the grammatical subject is the object of the action or the effect of the verb. For example, in the sentence They were impressed by his manner, were impressed is in the passive voice.
7. Chemistry Unreactive except under special or extreme conditions; inert.
8. Electronics Exhibiting no gain or contributing no energy: a passive circuit element.
9. Psychology Relating to or being an inactive or submissive role in a relationship, especially a sexual relationship.
n. Grammar
1. The passive voice.
2. A verb or construction in the passive voice.

[Middle English, from Old French passif, from Latin passīvus, subject to emotion, the passive, from passus, past participle of patī, to suffer; see pē(i)- in Indo-European roots.]

pas′sive·ly adv.
pas′sive·ness n.

passive

(ˈpæsɪv)
adj
1. not active or not participating perceptibly in an activity, organization, etc
2. unresisting and receptive to external forces; submissive
3. not working or operating
4. affected or acted upon by an external object or force
5. (Grammar) grammar denoting a voice of verbs in sentences in which the grammatical subject is not the logical subject but rather the recipient of the action described by the verb, as was broken in the sentence The glass was broken by a boy. Compare active5a
6. (Chemistry) chem (of a substance, esp a metal) apparently chemically unreactive, usually as a result of the formation of a thin protective layer that prevents further reaction
7. (Electronics) electronics telecomm
a. containing no source of power and therefore capable only of attenuating a signal: a passive network.
b. not capable of amplifying a signal or controlling a function: a passive communications satellite.
8. (Telecommunications) electronics telecomm
a. containing no source of power and therefore capable only of attenuating a signal: a passive network.
b. not capable of amplifying a signal or controlling a function: a passive communications satellite.
9. (Banking & Finance) finance (of a bond, share, debt, etc) yielding no interest
n
(Grammar) grammar
a. the passive voice
b. a passive verb
[C14: from Latin passīvus susceptible of suffering, from patī to undergo]
ˈpassively adv
pasˈsivity, ˈpassiveness n

pas•sive

(ˈpæs ɪv)

adj.
1. not reacting visibly to something that might be expected to produce manifestations of an emotion or feeling.
2. not participating readily or actively; inactive: a passive member of a committee.
3. inert or quiescent.
4. influenced, acted upon, or affected by some external force, cause, or agency (opposed to active).
5. receiving or characterized by the reception of impressions or influences from external sources.
6. produced or caused by an external agency.
7. receiving, enduring, or submitting without resistance; submissive.
8. of, pertaining to, or being a voice, verb form, or construction having a subject represented as undergoing the action expressed by the verb, as the sentence The letter was written last week (opposed to active).
9. chemically inactive, esp. under conditions in which chemical activity is to be expected.
10. (of a metal) treated so as to render corrosion-resistant.
11. (of a solar heating system) functioning without the aid of machinery, as pumps.
n.
12. the passive voice.
13. a passive verb form or construction.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin passīvus literally, submissive =pass(us) (past participle of patī to experience, undergo) + -īvus -ive]
pas′sive•ly, adv.

passive

In surveillance, an adjective applied to actions or equipments which emit no energy capable of being detected.

passive

Used to describe a form of verb in which the grammatical subject is the object of the action, for example, the sentence “The government took steps.” in the passive would be Steps were taken by the government.” Compare active
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.passive - the voice used to indicate that the grammatical subject of the verb is the recipient (not the source) of the action denoted by the verb; "`The ball was thrown by the boy' uses the passive voice"; "`The ball was thrown' is an abbreviated passive"
voice - (linguistics) the grammatical relation (active or passive) of the grammatical subject of a verb to the action that the verb denotes
Adj.1.passive - lacking in energy or will; "Much benevolence of the passive order may be traced to a disinclination to inflict pain upon oneself"- George Meredith
active - disposed to take action or effectuate change; "a director who takes an active interest in corporate operations"; "an active antagonism"; "he was active in drawing attention to their grievances"
2.passive - peacefully resistant in response to injustice; "passive resistance"
nonviolent - abstaining (on principle) from the use of violence
3.passive - expressing that the subject of the sentence is the patient of the action denoted by the verb; "academics seem to favor passive sentences"
grammar - the branch of linguistics that deals with syntax and morphology (and sometimes also deals with semantics)
active - expressing that the subject of the sentence has the semantic function of actor: "Hemingway favors active constructions"

passive

adjective
1. submissive, resigned, compliant, receptive, lifeless, docile, nonviolent, quiescent, acquiescent, unassertive, unresisting their passive acceptance of the new regime
submissive spirited, violent, lively, energetic, defiant, assertive, rebellious, feisty (informal, chiefly U.S. & Canad.), bossy (informal), domineering, zippy (informal)
2. inactive, inert, uninvolved, non-participating He took a passive role in the interview.
inactive involved, active

passive

adjective
Submitting without objection or resistance:
Translations
غَيْر فَعّال، سَلْبيمَبني للمَجْهولمُسْتَسْلِمٌ
pasivnítrpný
passiv
loidpassiiv
passiivinenkorotonpassiivipassiivimuotopassiivimuotoinen
pasivan
passzívszenvedõ
aîgerîalaus, óvirkurí òolmynd
受身の
수동적인
neveikiamosios rūšiespasyviaipasyvus
ciešamās kārtas-pasīvs
pasívnytrpný
trpnik
passiv
ไม่โต้แย้ง
pasiftepki göstermeyenedilgen
bị động

passive

[ˈpæsɪv]
A. ADJ (gen) → pasivo; (= inactive) → inactivo
B. N (Ling) → voz f pasiva
C. CPD passive resistance Nresistencia f pasiva
passive smoking Nfumar m pasivo

passive

[ˈpæsɪv]
adj
[person, attitude] → passif/ive
(GRAMMAR) [voice] → passif/ive
n (GRAMMAR) the passive → le passif

passive

adj
(Gram) → passivisch, passiv, Passiv-; passive formPassivform f
n (Gram) → Passiv nt, → Leideform f; in the passiveim Passiv

passive

:
passive resistance
passive smoker
passive smoking
passive vocabulary

passive

[ˈpæsɪv]
1. adj (gen) (Gram) → passivo/a
2. npassivo
in the passive → al passivo

passive

(ˈpӕsiv) adjective
1. showing no interest, emotion etc, or not resisting an attack etc. The villagers showed passive resistance to the enemy
2. of the form of the verb used when the subject receives the action of the verb. The boy was bitten by the dog.
ˈpassively adverb
ˈpassiveness noun
pasˈsivity noun

passive

مُسْتَسْلِمٌ pasivní passiv passiv παθητικός pasivo passiivinen passif pasivan passivo 受身の 수동적인 passief passiv bierny passivo пассивный passiv ไม่โต้แย้ง pasif bị động 被动的

pas·sive

a. pasivo-a; sumiso-a; inactivo-a, que no es espontáneo o activo;
___ exerciseejercicio ___.

passive

adj pasivo
References in classic literature ?
She always felt wicked after it, for the pretty things were seldom necessaries, but then they cost so little, it wasn't worth worrying about, so the trifles increased unconsciously, and in the shopping excursions she was no longer a passive looker-on.
He sat still and passive, his head resting against the back of the wooden rocking-chair, his hands relaxed upon the arms.
A few had straggled among the conquered columns, where they stalked in sullen discontent; attentive, though, as yet, passive observers of the moving multitude.
There was a listlessness in his gait, as if he saw no reason for taking one step further, nor felt any desire to do so, but would have been glad, could he be glad of anything, to fling himself down at the root of the nearest tree, and lie there passive for evermore.
Rather carried down alive to wondrous depths, where strange shapes of the unwarped primal world glided to and fro before his passive eyes; and the miser-merman, Wisdom, revealed his hoarded heaps; and among the joyous, heartless, ever-juvenile eternities, Pip saw the multitudinous, God-omnipresent, coral insects, that out of the firmament of waters heaved the colossal orbs.
There could be no harm in a scheme, a mere passive scheme.
Yes, in a passive way: I make no effort; I follow as inclination guides me.
Has he grown weary of indulgence, and passed from passive to active hatred?
Whether the motive was pride, or sullenness, or distrust of herself, or despair of doing good, the result was not to be mistaken -- Norah had resolved on remaining passive for the future.
This was no passive belief, but an active weapon which they flashed at more convenient places of business.
It appeared, in answer to my inquiries, that nobody had the least idea of the etymology of this terrible verb passive to be gormed; but that they all regarded it as constituting a most solemn imprecation.
He was not indifferent, for he told me that he hoped to live to see his gentleman one of the best of gentlemen in a foreign country; he was not disposed to be passive or resigned, as I understood it; but he had no notion of meeting danger half way.