pastiche


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pas·tiche

 (pă-stēsh′, pä-)
n.
1. A dramatic, artistic, literary, or musical piece openly imitating the previous works of other artists, often with satirical intent.
2. A pasticcio of incongruous parts; a hodgepodge: "In ... a city of splendid Victorian architecture ... there is a rather pointless pastiche of Dickensian London down on the waterfront" (Economist).

[French, from Italian pasticcio; see pasticcio.]

pastiche

(pæˈstiːʃ) or

pasticcio

n
1. (Art Terms) a work of art that mixes styles, materials, etc
2. (Art Terms) a work of art that imitates the style of another artist or period
[C19: French pastiche, Italian pasticcio, literally: piecrust (hence, something blended), from Late Latin pasta paste1]

pas•tiche

(pæˈstiʃ, pɑ-)

n.
1. a literary, musical, or artistic piece consisting wholly or chiefly of motifs or techniques from borrowed sources.
[1700–10; < French < Italian pasticcio < Vulgar Latin *pastīcium pasty, pie]

Pastiche, Pasticcio

 a medley, potpourri or hotchpotch; an opera made up of various pieces; a picture based on another’s design or style.
Examples: pasticcio of gauzes, pins and ribbons, 1785; our operas begin tomorrow with a pasticcio full of my favourite songs—Walpole, 1752.

pastiche

An imitation of another’s style.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pastiche - a musical composition consisting of a series of songs or other musical pieces from various sources
musical composition, opus, piece of music, composition, piece - a musical work that has been created; "the composition is written in four movements"
2.pastiche - a work of art that imitates the style of some previous work
work of art - art that is a product of one of the fine arts (especially a painting or sculpture of artistic merit)

pastiche

noun
1. medley, mixture, blend, motley, mélange (French), miscellany, farrago, hotchpotch, gallimaufry The world menu may be a pastiche of dishes from many countries.
2. parody, take-off, imitation a pastiche of Botticelli's Birth of Venus
Translations

pastiche

[pæsˈtiːʃ] Npastiche m, imitación f

pastiche

[pæˈstiːʃ] npastiche m

pastiche

nPastiche m; (= satirical writing)Persiflage f

pastiche

[pæˈstiːʃ] n (frm) → pastiche m inv
References in periodicals archive ?
Bursting with bathos as he riffs off of Wordsworth, Milton, and Burns or turning to absurdity the psalmic similes in the title poem, Higgins's verse revels in pastiche and political irreverence.
ISLAMABAD -- Pastiche - a group exhibition of innovative art by 11 emerging artists concluded here on Monday at Pakistan National Council of the Arts (PNCA) after serving the art lovers as a 2-month treat of visual art.
In 1978 Pastiche was released and spawned two more big hits, Walk In Life and On A Little Street In Singapore.
The Postmodern Aesthetics of Frederick Jameson: Pastiche and Schizophrenia
The Prince, a longstanding critic of Modernism, endorses a version of Classicism that is close to pastiche.
They are comprised of biographies of the creators, overviews of their books, reasons the series continued, and lists of original and pastiche works.
VIVA 18, 122mins Anna Biller directs, writes and takes the lead role in this culty pastiche of 1970s soft-core films, as LA suburban couples embrace the sexual revolution and get into booze, drugs and orgies.
LICHFIELD'S new multi-million pound shopping development will not be a pastiche of what has gone before nor looked back on in shame like the mistakes of the 60s and 70s.
Beckham has become a pastiche of everything that's wrong with football.
Green has been given free reign to let loose even more with his trademark gospel whoops and hollers (and shows some impressive songwriting chops), while Danger Mouse's pastiche of drum hits, organs, strings and distorted guitar samples perfectly complement Green's vocal and lyrical gymnastics on dysfunctional relationships (the monster hit single "Crazy"), paranoia ("Monster In My Closet") and standard MC braggadocio ("Feng Shui").
superhero comic Marvelman (Miracleman in the United States), Moore changed the rules of the game, introducing pastiche, artful juxtapositions, intertextuality (in which real and invented portions from novels, histories, and other sources flesh out the story), an obsession with historical eras (in particular the Victorian and Edwardian periods), and a flair for the ominous and surreal.
More, though, than just a pastiche, Jan Dunn's film succeeds by mining deep into the lives of a working-class U.