pathogen


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path·o·gen

 (păth′ə-jən)
n.
An agent that causes disease, especially a virus, bacterium, or fungus.

pathogen

(ˈpæθəˌdʒɛn) or

pathogene

n
(Pathology) any agent that can cause disease

path•o•gen

(ˈpæθ ə dʒən, -ˌdʒɛn)

n.
any disease-producing agent, esp. a virus, bacterium, or other microorganism.
[1940–45]

path·o·gen

(păth′ə-jən)
An agent that causes infection or disease, especially a microorganism, such as a bacterium or protozoan, or a virus. See Note at germ.

pathogen

A disease-producing microorganism.

pathogen

1. A disease-causing organism.
2. A microorganism that causes disease.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pathogen - any disease-producing agent (especially a virus or bacterium or other microorganism)
microorganism, micro-organism - any organism of microscopic size
infectious agent, infective agent - an agent capable of producing infection
Translations
patogeenitaudinaiheuttaja

pathogen

[ˈpæθəʊdʒen] Npatógeno m

pathogen

[ˈpæθədʒɛn] nagent m pathogène

pathogen

n (Med) → Krankheitserreger m

pathogen

[ˈpæθəˌdʒɛn] nagente m patogeno

path·o·gen

n. patógeno, agente capaz de producir una enfermedad.

pathogen

n patógeno, agente patógeno
References in periodicals archive ?
Systems for real time, linked foodborne pathogen surveillance 4.
41), it is time to form "a joint expert working group to design and implement a global animal surveillance system for zoonotic pathogens that gives early warning of pathogen emergence, is closely integrated to public health surveillance and provides opportunities to control such pathogens before they can affect human health, food supply, economics or biodiversity.
Federal and state officials have found the implicated bacterial strain in cow feces, water, and wild pigs at sites near the four suspected spinach farms in California, but they still don't know how the pathogen got to the greens.
Pregnancies that demonstrated such exposure were more likely to be in white women, women who had symptomatic bacterial vaginosis, and women who experienced vaginal bleeding, which was the most significant variable associated with oral pathogen exposure (adjusted risk ratio 1.
Fourteen patients--10 from the pathogen group and four from the "clean" group--eventually developed respiratory infections.
Similarly, microbiologic success 10 years ago was declared when there was only a reduction in the amount of a particular pathogen rather than an eradication.
In other words, there is no risk of infection, yet there is high-level antigen expression; problem pathogen antigens (such as those involved in immune evasion) can be removed, or other genes added; and antigens can be easily manipulated using recombinant DNA technologies that are now well established.
In particular, she highlights the work of Carol Tucker Foreman, who founded the Safe Food Coalition and lobbied forcefully for science-based pathogen standards, yet also headed a D.
The National Cattlemen's Beef Association has invested about $8 million in research on pathogen reduction technologies including irradiation, steam and pasteurization, says Gary Cowman, the NCBA's executive director for research and technical service.
sharps disposal containers, self and sheathing needles) that isolate or remove the bloodborne pathogen risk from the workplace.
Most methods used in pathogen detection are not 100 percent efficient, and concentrations are always underestimated.
This is virtually an all-or-none affair in which a plant that is resistant to one pathogen race may be totally susceptible to a different race.