patois


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Pat·ois

 (păt′wä′, pă-twä′)
n.
Variant of Patwa.

pat·ois

 (păt′wä′, pă-twä′)
n. pl. pat·ois (păt′wäz′, pă-twä′)
1.
a. A regional dialect, especially one without a literary tradition.
b. Nonstandard speech.
2. The special jargon of a group; cant.

[French, from Old French, incomprehensible or crude speech, local dialect, from patoier, to gesticulate (like one unable to speak), speak crudely, from pate, paw, from Vulgar Latin *patta, probably originally imitative of the sound of one object striking another, such as the footfall of an animal.]

patois

(ˈpætwɑː; French patwa)
n, pl patois (ˈpætwɑːz; French patwa)
1. (Linguistics) an unwritten regional dialect of a language, esp of French, usually considered substandard
2. (Linguistics) the jargon of particular group
[C17: from Old French: rustic speech, perhaps from patoier to handle awkwardly, from patte paw]

pat•ois

(ˈpæt wɑ, ˈpɑ twɑ, pæˈtwɑ)

n., pl. pat•ois (ˈpæt wɑz, ˈpɑ twɑz, pæˈtwɑz)
1. a regional form of a language, esp. of French, differing from the standard, literary form of the language.
2. a rural or provincial form of speech.
3. jargon; cant; argot.
[1635–45; < French; akin to Old French patoier to handle clumsily, derivative of pate paw]

patois

A regional dialect, or a jargon belonging to a particular group of people.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.patois - a characteristic language of a particular group (as among thieves); "they don't speak our lingo"
bite - a portion removed from the whole; "the government's weekly bite from my paycheck"
swiz - British slang for a swindle
heist, rip-off - the act of stealing
shakedown - extortion of money (as by blackmail)
power trip - (slang) a self-aggrandizing action undertaken simply for the pleasure of exercising control over other people
blowjob, cock sucking - slang for fellatio
hand job, jacking off, jerking off, wank - slang for masturbation
dekko - British slang for a look
square-bashing - drill on a barracks square
shakedown - a very thorough search of a person or a place; "a shakedown by the police uncovered the drugs"
caff - informal British term for a cafe
deck - street name for a packet of illegal drugs
gat, rod - a gangster's pistol
Mickey Finn - slang term for knockout drops
nick - (British slang) a prison; "he's in the nick"
dreck, schlock, shlock - merchandise that is shoddy or inferior
cert - an absolute certainty; "it's a dead cert"
legs - staying power; "that old Broadway play really has legs"
soup-strainer, toothbrush - slang for a mustache
arsehole, bunghole, arse, asshole - vulgar slang for anus
bay window, potbelly, tummy, corporation, pot - slang for a paunch
niff, pong - an unpleasant smell
street name - slang for something (especially for an illegal drug); "`smack' is a street name for heroin"
corker - (dated slang) a remarkable or excellent thing or person; "that story was a corker"
hooey, poppycock, stuff and nonsense, stuff - senseless talk; "don't give me that stuff"
baloney, bilgewater, boloney, bosh, drool, humbug, tommyrot, tosh, twaddle, taradiddle, tarradiddle - pretentious or silly talk or writing
codswallop, folderol, trumpery, wish-wash, applesauce, tripe, rubbish, trash - nonsensical talk or writing
skin flick - a pornographic movie
dibs - a claim of rights; "I have dibs on that last slice of pizza"
non-standard speech - speech that differs from the usual accepted, easily recognizable speech of native adult members of a speech community
rhyming slang - slang that replaces words with rhyming words or expressions and then typically omits the rhyming component; "Cockney rhyming slang"
bunfight, bun-fight - (Briticism) a grand formal party on an important occasion
burnup - a high-speed motorcycle race on a public road
nosh-up - a large satisfying meal
hood - (slang) a neighborhood
'hood - (slang) a neighborhood
paleface - (slang) a derogatory term for a white person (supposedly used by North American Indians)
poor white trash, white trash - (slang) an offensive term for White people who are impoverished
honkey, honkie, honky, whitey - (slang) offensive names for a White man
slant-eye, gook - (slang) a disparaging term for an Asian person (especially for North Vietnamese soldiers in the Vietnam War)
Injun, red man, Redskin - (slang) offensive term for Native Americans
hymie, kike, sheeny, yid - (ethnic slur) offensive term for a Jew
Chinaman, chink - (ethnic slur) offensive term for a person of Chinese descent
dago, ginzo, greaseball, wop, Guinea - (ethnic slur) offensive term for a person of Italian descent
Jap, Nip - (offensive slang) offensive term for a person of Japanese descent
spic, spick, spik - (ethnic slur) offensive term for persons of Latin American descent
Boche, Jerry, Kraut, Krauthead, Hun - offensive term for a person of German descent
2.patois - a regional dialect of a language (especially French); usually considered substandard
French - the Romance language spoken in France and in countries colonized by France
dialect, idiom, accent - the usage or vocabulary that is characteristic of a specific group of people; "the immigrants spoke an odd dialect of English"; "he has a strong German accent"; "it has been said that a language is a dialect with an army and navy"

patois

noun
1. dialect, vernacular In France patois was spoken in rural regions.
2. jargon, slang, vernacular, patter, cant, lingo (informal), argot people from the ghetto who speak street patois

patois

noun
1. A variety of a language that differs from the standard form:
2. Specialized expressions indigenous to a particular field, subject, trade, or subculture:
Translations

patois

[ˈpætwɑː] N (patois (pl)) → dialecto m, jerga f

patois

[ˈpætwɑː] n (= dialect) → patois m

patois

nMundart f
References in classic literature ?
Old Celestine, with a bandana tignon twisted about her head, hobbled in and out, taking a personal interest in everything; and she lingered occasionally to talk patois with Robert, whom she had known as a boy.
Amid the jargon of Indian dialects that he now plainly heard, it was easy to distinguish not only words, but sentences, in the patois of the Canadas.
My son," said the old Gascon gentleman, in that pure Bearn PATOIS of which Henry IV could never rid himself, "this horse was born in the house of your father about thirteen years ago, and has remained in it ever since, which ought to make you love it.
Their language is of the same piebald character, being a French patois, embroidered with Indian and English words and phrases.
These words, said in the Corsican patois, stopped Lucien at the moment when he was springing under the portico.
I feel a strong impulse to try him with that unique patois word, which, whistled after a peculiar manner, when I was a boy never failed to succeed in the mountains of Orb--Beni
Never a moment did that sublime spirit speak in their patois.
Zephaniah, now based in Beijing and Lincolnshire, said the complaints about the patois were wide of the mark because it's important to represent a range of accents on kids' telly.
A spokesperson for the BBC said Mr De Souza's books are written in "Afro-Caribbean patois rhyme" and this has been transferred to the TV series to retain its "heart, integrity and distinctive quality".
A quarter of the vehicles carry the patois adverts.
Lucian cast and production staff, "Apwe Plezi" featured realistic characters in a local setting speaking a combination of patois and English.
Daily activities, included in the package price, include bicycling, table tennis, volleyball, water aerobics, morning hikes, patois lessons, beach cricket, golf clinics, bingo, backgammon, chess, plus classes in cocktail making, coconut carving and local dancing.