patriarchism

patriarchism

a patriarchal government in a society or a church. — patriarchist, n.
See also: Government
References in periodicals archive ?
This lingering patriarchism and misconceptions in male-female encounters lead to the question of how this plays a role concerning a very delicate issue in senior management: the lack of women in the C-suite (Barreto, Ryan, and Schmitt, 2009).
In her study of Njabulo Ndebele's The Cry of Winnie Mandela, for example, Dorothy Driver argues that "British colonialism invented in Africa a version of patriarchism reminiscent of what it felt to be a European tradition" (11).
Adapting the English gentry's patriarchism and the Anglican Church's hierarchical authority to their own purposes, the great planters projected an image of themselves as the divinely chosen leaders of an idyllic plantation society--virtuous, good-natured "fathers," concerned for the spiritual and corporeal welfare of the enslaved blacks and other dependents (white women and children) who made up their plantation households.
Quema also distinguishes the presence of modernist contradictions between Lewis's fiction and his nonfiction, as well as explores Lewis's modernist response to the erosion of traditional patriarchism.
1) Patriarchism involved the 'subordination of children and women to the male head of family who held control over the wealth of the family, the sexuality of its women, and the labour power of all its members, free and slave'.
5) In so doing, the Pentecostal churches add strength to the patriarchism of society at large and, unwittingly, reproduce the subtle values that relegate women to second place.
Inculturation is possible if the church rejects Eurocentrism, authoritarianism, patriarchism and the spiritualisms that are destructive of nature and of the body.