patriarchy


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pa·tri·ar·chy

 (pā′trē-är′kē)
n. pl. pa·tri·ar·chies
1.
a. A social system in which the father is the head of the family.
b. A family, community, or society based on this system or governed by men.
2.
a. Dominance of a society by men, or the values that uphold such dominance.
b. The collection of men in positions of power, exerting such dominance. In all senses also called patriarchate.

patriarchy

(ˈpeɪtrɪˌɑːkɪ)
n, pl -chies
1. (Sociology) a form of social organization in which a male is the head of the family and descent, kinship, and title are traced through the male line
2. (Sociology) any society governed by such a system

pa•tri•ar•chy

(ˈpeɪ triˌɑr ki)

n., pl. -chies.
1.
a. a form of social organization in which the father is the head of the family, clan, or tribe and descent is reckoned in the male line.
b. a society based on this social organization.
2.
a. an institution or organization in which power is held by and transferred through males.
b. the principles or philosophy upon which control by male authority is based.
[1555–65; < Greek]

patriarchy

1. a community in which the father or oldest male is the supreme authority, and descent is traced through the male line.
2. government by males, with one as supreme. — patriarchist, n. — patri-archic, patriarchical, adj.
See also: Male
1. a community in which the father or oldest male is the supreme authority in the family, clan, or tribe, and descent is traced through the male line.
2. government by males, with one as supreme. — patriarchist, n. — patri-archic, patriarchical, adj.
See also: Father
a society organized to give supremacy to the father or the oldest male in governing a family, tribe, or clan. — patriarch, n.
See also: Government
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.patriarchy - a form of social organization in which a male is the family head and title is traced through the male line
social organisation, social organization, social structure, social system, structure - the people in a society considered as a system organized by a characteristic pattern of relationships; "the social organization of England and America is very different"; "sociologists have studied the changing structure of the family"
Translations

patriarchy

[ˈpeɪtrɪˌɑːkɪ] Npatriarcado m

patriarchy

nPatriarchat nt
References in periodicals archive ?
Note well that Robbins accuses patriarchy of having defined "childbearing" as "women's work" and thus having deceived unsuspecting females for millennia.
But in the developing world, where culture and tradition continue to frame the roles, experiences, and expectations of girls and women, the effects of patriarchy, second-class status, and domestic violence on women have been less explored.
Avuncularism: Capitalism, Patriarchy and Nineteenth-Century English Culture.
Patriarchy is the social system in which males are dominant over females by virtue of gender.
The post-Vatican II years have moved us into the long haul work of focusing our energies on resisting the power-over/dominating character of what Vandana Siva describes as "capitalist and religious patriarchy.
However, as white women are incorporated into the patriarchy as full members, nonwhite subjects in the west are still largely excluded from discourse.
White supremacist capitalist patriarchy as a matrix of social-political-cultural arrangements that endure over time comes complete with the canonical authorities of reason, science and religion, which allegedly undergird the "nature" of human beings and their individual/communal lives together.
Though often portrayed as interchangeable categories, Shepard contends that manhood, masculinity, and patriarchy represented disparate and often conflicting concepts in early modern England.
As a deist she rejected the patriarchy of the church in favor of an unknowable but all-sufficient god of nature--though biographer Eleanor Flexner and others point to evidence that she died an agnostic.
She sees the text so steeped in patriarchy that little if anything can be gleaned from the story except another example of our religious tradition's suppression of women.
Khan's film draws a picture of Egyptian upper class's infatuation with 'Western' values as a facade that masks, and essentially legitimizes patriarchy and social repression.
This failure was largely due to the dynamic overlap of homophobia and class privilege that has stunted most discussions of the way unchallenged patriarchy and sexism are integral to the experience of those on the DL and those they may infect.